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Could one have a food allergy and not show any symptoms?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created October 03, 2011 at 7:27 PM

Could one have a food allergy and not show any symptoms? If so, how did you finally find out you had an allergy to that particular food?

C4134ed417dbc0a6b79ab2cee32632d3

(1801)

on October 04, 2011
at 02:20 PM

My DS has a delayed skin reaction to dairy, it takes up to three weeks to clear & this is what flummoxed us to begin with. We couldn't identify his trigger...

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6 Answers

5
96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on October 03, 2011
at 09:09 PM

First, of course, you need to define allergy. Based on my dictionary I have at least some allergic reactions to wheat but I ate it for 60 years and never realized it was the cause of my migraines, joint pains, GERD, stuffy nose, hacking cough, food addiction, swollen and unhappy belly and other symptoms I don't know about--until I changed to the primal lifestyle 6 months ago.

4
345c1755efe005edd162b770dc6fb821

(8767)

on October 03, 2011
at 09:40 PM

Often times the allergic reaction, or intolerance doesn't show up as a symptom that you recognize, in that case, you might be surprised to find out that you even have allergies.

A lot of times people either are use to living with symptoms that aren't too inconvenient, or think they are the result of something entirely different.

I guess if your symptoms aren't too severe, you stand a good chance to remove things and test without too much additional damage. Its a good thing for the long run!

2
1f96ce108240f19345c05704c7709dad

(1061)

on October 04, 2011
at 12:14 AM

I have a fixed food allergy to crustaceans. So, I have done a lot of research into food allergies.

My reactions are very quick, and even very tiny amounts can kick off a big reaction. So, I avoid all crustaceans.

Apparently some people have delayed reactions to particular foods; these can take two or three days to show up. This can make it very hard to identify a particular food as an allergen.

One can also be slightly allergic to something and eat a bit without problem. But, there may be a a threshold, where, say three or four bits, cause a reaction. Again, if eat a bit one day, none for a day, then a bit the next day, then another bit the next day, and BOOM - you get a reaction. It can be hard to track done.

Elimination diets can help - you eat a restricted number of foods for a least four days (longer if you have slow bowel clearing). You do not want any amount of test foods in your system when you introduce test foods. Once you are sure you have, say, no dairy in your system, you drink a good amount of milk for lunch (at least two glasses; and eat nothing else). Most reactions will show up within a few hours; but some can take two or three days. So, you want two or three days; if no reaction, introduce another test food, say apples. Do this for all the foods you want to eat.

C4134ed417dbc0a6b79ab2cee32632d3

(1801)

on October 04, 2011
at 02:20 PM

My DS has a delayed skin reaction to dairy, it takes up to three weeks to clear & this is what flummoxed us to begin with. We couldn't identify his trigger...

2
F1b39d4f620876330312f4925bd51900

(4090)

on October 03, 2011
at 09:08 PM

I found out I was gluten intolerant when my doctor threw in a blood test for it, on a whim. I had gone in for an unrelated issue.

1
Bdf98e5a57befa6f0877f978ba09871c

on October 04, 2011
at 03:18 AM

It depends on what you count as a 'reaction'. You may not break out into hives, go into shock, or vomit, but your body might react in other ways. If you're noticing a pattern, then cut out a particular allergen and see what happens. Eventually, you might want to get some sort of test done.

0
F40555b9be81e12c2fc460e6fa7d097c

on October 04, 2011
at 04:20 AM

Absolutely. I wasn't diagnosed with my Celiacs until just last year, I'm 24 years old and my main symptoms are nausea, stomach discomfort, and malabsorption. My mother always told me I was weaned too early and that was why I had a bad stomach and my propensity to have high blood iron (my family has a history of hemochromatosis) masked my malabsorption until it finally went critical and I ended up in the hospital with fairly devastating malnutrition. Other than a few nutrient deficiencies here and there throughout my life I had no reason to believe my body wasn't receiving enough nutrition! After-all, I was overweight, it didn't make sense to me.

There are a lot of factors at play in your body, and it can compensate for certain issues for a very long time. In my case it took my body finally breaking down for me to see a specialist and get the diagnosis and treatment plan that I needed.

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