3

votes

ALCAT - Food Allergy Testing

Answered on September 29, 2014
Created October 28, 2010 at 8:50 PM

http://www.alcat.com/

My doctor recommended I take this. Has anyone had this done, or have thoughts on its validity? Basically, they draw your blood and expose it various commonly allergenic food particles and see how it reacts to them. From that they determine a list of foods that you shouldn't be eating. Costs a couple hundred bucks.

I think I'm gonna have it done, but I was wondering what PaleoHacks thought of it.

061f71ea28bcab7a992f4c78eeb16cc4

on December 21, 2013
at 06:15 PM

I wouldn't be sad @CaveMan_Mike.

ALCAT traditionally has helped many people as you can see in the comments here. It's just that it's been improved upon.

The MRT test is from the same developer but with newer technology much better reproducability and more consistent clinical results.

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on December 21, 2013
at 04:39 PM

OMG: my doctor suggested the alcat test and I was about to spend $600 on the test. I wouldn't mind the money if the test was correct and reproducible. Your video makes me sad as I was hoping alcat might reveal what's going on with me. Is the leap mrt the test you still recommend?

1ac8e976f84cb2566ecfbbcce1817351

(211)

on April 27, 2011
at 03:44 PM

I need a "medical reason" so my school-insurance can cover this. What do you guys recommend I say so I can do this testing, for free?

B22e5946e28a1845a6006737e59edfc6

(2437)

on November 16, 2010
at 12:32 AM

You know what, I think I might have just had a messed up gut. Ive taken out eggs, soy and nightshades (in addition to no dairy, grains, or legumes) and Im finally starting to feel better. I must have a very leaky gut.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on November 03, 2010
at 12:29 AM

I think you could be correct about eliminating common allergens. Maybe the method works, it just still seems unproven. Companies selling tests on the web avoid having to prove the tests work, unlike those used in hospitals or labs for example. I suspect if it worked as well as they claim scientists would be using it research. Allergies and intolerances are still hard to determine accurately with tests and I worry about people being incorrectly told they have an allergy or intolerence to something when they don't.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on November 03, 2010
at 12:29 AM

I think you could be correct about eliminating common allergens. Maybe the method works, it jsut still seems unproven. Companies selling tests on the web avoid having to prove the tests work, unlike those used in hospitals or labs for example. I suspect if it worked as well as they claim scientists would be using it research. Allergies and intolerances are still hard to determine accurately with tests and I worry about people being incorrectly told they have an allergy or intolerence to something when they don't.

14aa918d730371ed14f8e7e7d6eb6587

(373)

on November 02, 2010
at 11:48 PM

Thanks for the feedback. Was wheat one of the eliminated foods? Yeah I remember my doctor saying that one lady tested allergenic to things like pork and basil (along with common stuff like wheat). Seems kinda random to me, but it did cure her chronically swollen knees.

14aa918d730371ed14f8e7e7d6eb6587

(373)

on November 02, 2010
at 11:41 PM

I'll report what happens to me -- that definitely sheds some negative light on it.

14aa918d730371ed14f8e7e7d6eb6587

(373)

on November 02, 2010
at 11:34 PM

what do you mean by fecal tests?

14aa918d730371ed14f8e7e7d6eb6587

(373)

on November 02, 2010
at 11:32 PM

Wow, thanks a lot. My doctor is kind of an alternative guy, those links definitely draw out my skepticism, but there seems to be some positive feedback from those that have taken it. Of course, that raises the question -- is it actually valid or is it merely eliminating commonly allergenic foods and by chance getting some of them correct?

14aa918d730371ed14f8e7e7d6eb6587

(373)

on November 02, 2010
at 11:28 PM

Thanks. We've met our deductible so our insurance is going to knock off a significant portion of the $2000 cost.

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13 Answers

5
F8ae788692116350b2ea27f630e09ad9

on October 29, 2010
at 02:16 PM

I highly recommend this test. I had it done and had very dramatic results by following the protocol.

The test enabled me to eliminate the foods that were keeping my stomach and body in a chronic inflammatory state. I had been struggling with joint pain and gastrointestinal issues. I was told by my doc that I had "Leaky Gut Syndrome." I was amazed that the foods that I was eating were causing the problem all along. Most of which were seemingly good nutritional choices by any standard. After following the protocol my gut healed and I was finally able to return to eating ALL of the foods that were causing the problem with no ill effect.

The real upside here is that by getting rid of the chronic gut inflammation I was finally able to lose the weight I needed to... I went from 223 to 178!

I highly recommend this test but I encourage you to follow the complete protocol to get the best results!

14aa918d730371ed14f8e7e7d6eb6587

(373)

on November 02, 2010
at 11:48 PM

Thanks for the feedback. Was wheat one of the eliminated foods? Yeah I remember my doctor saying that one lady tested allergenic to things like pork and basil (along with common stuff like wheat). Seems kinda random to me, but it did cure her chronically swollen knees.

4
0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on October 30, 2010
at 05:30 PM

This is what I could find on the ALCAT method of allergy testing. There is very little published on the subject. Most of the references given by the company appear to be unpublished or presentations given at conferences, which makes me a little dubious. Selling people tests is often a good way to make money.

Unproven techniques in allergy diagnosis (2005).

In summary, the ALCAT test system represents a new edition of some old claims of ???cytotoxic testing???, claims which up to now have not proven to be scientifically established. The ALCAT test system is for the time being relying on unproven statements that lack scientific and clinical proofs of efficacy.

Controversial aspects of adverse reactions to food (1999).

All kinds of unproven techniques and tests are abundant in the alternative medicine market, and usually these totally escape of??cial control. Only rarely are results on these tests published in papers covered by the standard databases. In the cytotoxicity test, a food allergen is added to whole blood or to leukocyte suspensions. The reduction in number or the change in appearance of the cells would indicate a sensitivity to a speci??c food (171??173). However, controlled studies (174??176) have not shown any ef??cacy of the test in diagnosing food allergy or intolerance. In contrast, several studies demonstrated that this test cannot distinguish between offending and tolerated foods and between active treatment and placebo (176, 177). Moreover, test results were not reproducible when repeated several times on the same patient with the same food allergen.

A test for non-IgE-mediated food hypersensitivity (ALCAT TM) has been launched; it measures changes in whitecell diameter after challenge with foods in vitro. The procedure is not documented, as only a few relevant papers are listed in the databases. Most of these discourage the use of the test due to lack of reproducibility, whereas the other reports do not ful??l the inclusion criteria mentioned earlier (178). Therefore, more investigations need to be published. Since many trials with a negative outcome are never published, the risk of a tendency to overestimate the eficacy of the test should be borne in mind.

Inappropriate test methods in allergy (2010).

Successful internet marketing, infiltration of academic programs and superficial reporting by the media promote the popularity of unqualified diagnostic tests; also in allergy. Therefore, critical observation and quick analysis of and clear comments to unqualified methods by the scientific medical societies are more important than ever.

14aa918d730371ed14f8e7e7d6eb6587

(373)

on November 02, 2010
at 11:32 PM

Wow, thanks a lot. My doctor is kind of an alternative guy, those links definitely draw out my skepticism, but there seems to be some positive feedback from those that have taken it. Of course, that raises the question -- is it actually valid or is it merely eliminating commonly allergenic foods and by chance getting some of them correct?

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on November 03, 2010
at 12:29 AM

I think you could be correct about eliminating common allergens. Maybe the method works, it just still seems unproven. Companies selling tests on the web avoid having to prove the tests work, unlike those used in hospitals or labs for example. I suspect if it worked as well as they claim scientists would be using it research. Allergies and intolerances are still hard to determine accurately with tests and I worry about people being incorrectly told they have an allergy or intolerence to something when they don't.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19245)

on November 03, 2010
at 12:29 AM

I think you could be correct about eliminating common allergens. Maybe the method works, it jsut still seems unproven. Companies selling tests on the web avoid having to prove the tests work, unlike those used in hospitals or labs for example. I suspect if it worked as well as they claim scientists would be using it research. Allergies and intolerances are still hard to determine accurately with tests and I worry about people being incorrectly told they have an allergy or intolerence to something when they don't.

3
B22e5946e28a1845a6006737e59edfc6

(2437)

on October 30, 2010
at 01:39 AM

It told me I was allergic to beef. It also only listed the foods I was currently eating as me having an allergy to. Not one food that I didn't eat often came up as an allergen. I thougt that this was pretty weird.

14aa918d730371ed14f8e7e7d6eb6587

(373)

on November 02, 2010
at 11:41 PM

I'll report what happens to me -- that definitely sheds some negative light on it.

B22e5946e28a1845a6006737e59edfc6

(2437)

on November 16, 2010
at 12:32 AM

You know what, I think I might have just had a messed up gut. Ive taken out eggs, soy and nightshades (in addition to no dairy, grains, or legumes) and Im finally starting to feel better. I must have a very leaky gut.

2
B58511bcd1ecc0dd4ad8130859513c81

on July 21, 2011
at 07:17 PM

I did the ALCAT, but unfortunately I was intolerant to 95% of every food on the list.. Left me upset and frustrated as I did not know what to eat. I don't know if I would spend the $300 on it again.

2
0dc1d63c3d5975f5115f535c6a90c9dd

(2283)

on October 29, 2010
at 02:45 AM

My son and I both did. Best thing I've ever done. After the results came in, we eliminated the allergenic foods and no more eczema on my baby!

1
F1b39d4f620876330312f4925bd51900

(4090)

on July 21, 2011
at 10:30 PM

My full allergy test ($$$) showed a eggs and dairy only, but foods I had been avoiding for a known allergy (gluten and soy) did not show up as allergens. To me that means unless you eat it regularly, there is chance it would show up. However, I am still very allergic (IGG) to those two foods, so its not like avoiding them relapsed the allergy or anything. If you are as motivated as me to get your tummy in line, then any test can be a part of your foundation for figuring things out. Cutting out the eggs and dairy didn't help either, BTW.

1
E46d4f7e35e46ee4e8211ab4bc852023

(1510)

on October 30, 2010
at 03:11 AM

Thru my doctor, I did IgG Food Allergy Testing by ELISA, which was extremely helpful. Once I knew that I was having actual food allergies to gluten, soy, and dairy, it was really easy to cut them out. I sometimes have a whole mental block of "well, science says most people have X,Y,Z but how do I even know that applies to me?"

It seems like this ALCAT test is similar but potentially more comprehensive. For the IgG blood test, the most basic one only costs about $85 and some insurance companies cover it, so it might be something to consider for a cheaper option.

14aa918d730371ed14f8e7e7d6eb6587

(373)

on November 02, 2010
at 11:28 PM

Thanks. We've met our deductible so our insurance is going to knock off a significant portion of the $2000 cost.

1ac8e976f84cb2566ecfbbcce1817351

(211)

on April 27, 2011
at 03:44 PM

I need a "medical reason" so my school-insurance can cover this. What do you guys recommend I say so I can do this testing, for free?

1
Fd504de9b242f4cd7009db70af5e2121

(558)

on October 29, 2010
at 10:30 PM

I had something called an LEAP MRT test that is similar.My only regret is not doing it sooner,highly recommended for IBD.

1
4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

on October 29, 2010
at 02:57 AM

My understanding is that testing is inconsistent. You have to have eaten the food recently and had a reaction.

The fecal tests are more accurate from what I've read

14aa918d730371ed14f8e7e7d6eb6587

(373)

on November 02, 2010
at 11:34 PM

what do you mean by fecal tests?

0
00cd3b6f51530a6832fcda1712edbec3

(2411)

on September 29, 2014
at 11:57 PM

All these tests can possibly do is detect what you're sensitive to right now.  They can't imply an underlying cause, e.g., intestinal permeability, as many here have found they had.  Rather than spend money on tests, first review the symptoms of SIBO, particularly to distinguish between hydrogen-based and methane-based presentations, to be sure that you're not dealing with this issue. If it seems that you are, then diet alone won't fix this; you'll need either conventional antibiotics or natural ones (Lauricidin, oil of oregano) — both of which require a doctor's (MD or ND) supervision.  There's more material on SIBO on Dr. Alison Siebecker's site.

In addition, try an elimination diet, either a low-FODMAP plan or the SCD.  Those are also good adjunct therapies for SIBO treatment, too. 

It's always a good idea to start drinking a cup of bone broth daily, too.  The gelatin will help restore the gut's protective mucosal layer.

 

0
Medium avatar

on May 23, 2014
at 12:21 PM

The ALCAT Test is utilized to uncover natural insusceptible framework reaction to ingestion of normal culpable nourishments, frequently connected with GI irritation, reflecting affectability/intolerance on a cell level.

0
Bd21173f20425f279578744bdb8f4e7e

on May 22, 2014
at 12:52 AM

Was curious to see if you had the test done... Just got my results back today... Interesting results.. Did relay that I have a sever reaction to Gluten/Gliadin which I suspected after a Whole30 and have been gluten free for 3 months now... The Black Pepper, Strawberry, Crab, Pear, Grapes and Broccoli were in the severe category which I found an odd combo...

0
061f71ea28bcab7a992f4c78eeb16cc4

on September 30, 2013
at 09:40 AM

I had heard of all this before, both good anecdotal reports and not so good research to back some of it up so I decided to "test the test". I did ALCAT and MRT and made a video comparing the results: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WXJpGmyrxTU

ALCAT vs. MRT

Hope that's helpful.

5b8b633f4af72f2b577c8d190fbd9166

on September 29, 2014
at 10:22 PM

Hi Allen, is there any way I could see that video?  It is set to private.  Thanks

061f71ea28bcab7a992f4c78eeb16cc4

on December 21, 2013
at 06:15 PM

I wouldn't be sad @CaveMan_Mike.

ALCAT traditionally has helped many people as you can see in the comments here. It's just that it's been improved upon.

The MRT test is from the same developer but with newer technology much better reproducability and more consistent clinical results.

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on December 21, 2013
at 04:39 PM

OMG: my doctor suggested the alcat test and I was about to spend $600 on the test. I wouldn't mind the money if the test was correct and reproducible. Your video makes me sad as I was hoping alcat might reveal what's going on with me. Is the leap mrt the test you still recommend?

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