3

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Condiments Effects on Intestinal Permeability

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 26, 2012 at 4:39 AM

Has anyone else besides me noticed various condiments effects on symptoms of inflammation?

Case in point: About a week ago I ate eggs with zero signs of intestinal distress or inflammation. A few days later I added black pepper to the mix and noticed that the consumption of both together actually made me wheeze slightly upon breathing and added just a touch of "brain fog". Hot sauce containing red pepper caused a similar reaction as to the black pepper.

So I did a little research finding that egg sensitivity is common in those with leaky gut. The symptoms of this somewhat benign allergy disappeared along with the leaky gut in some.

Intestinal permeability being of an utmost interest of mine, since giving up gluten has helped me so much, I wasn't surprised to find that http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/12046863/ - piperine has a deleterious effect on tight junctions and brush border cells. Capsaicin from red peppers does something similar.

I find it interesting that curcumin, which decreases intestinal permeability, is often combined with piperine in the intention to cause a greater desired effect when in fact this practice could result in the very opposite depending on the condition its used for.

Has anyone else come up with similar research on once thought of "paleo safe" additives actually being harmful?

963322f175cdd4c5f7d52cc372b3a167

(646)

on August 29, 2012
at 02:10 AM

Get a sense of humor, dude.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on August 28, 2012
at 10:11 AM

wtf are you talking about?

E2b72f1912f777917d8ee6b7fba43c26

(2384)

on August 27, 2012
at 02:42 PM

Hi, I just read thru some studies again and I wouldn't say, those spices increase intestinal permeability but rather the absorption surface. piperine, curcumin and all the othger spices do somehow increase villi size und crypt depth, which promotes nutrient absorption. If you're allergic this larger surface will also make contact with allergens more likely. What do you think?

9ac3c98b22d891af8ecf4513cf1daf85

(15)

on August 26, 2012
at 12:09 PM

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/18227041/ Sorry, I use my phone as my internet source most of the time and multiple copy/pastes in a single post are tedious and I'm lazy from all that egg/piperine combo.

E2b72f1912f777917d8ee6b7fba43c26

(2384)

on August 26, 2012
at 08:00 AM

Do you have a study at hand which shows the effects of turmeric on intestinal permeability?

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5 Answers

1
E2b72f1912f777917d8ee6b7fba43c26

(2384)

on August 26, 2012
at 07:44 AM

Yeah, I'm allergic to dairy, but I can tolerate ghee well. This totally changes when I add capsaicin containing spices. Haven't tried pepper yet.

0
C676bb33548b1c8add2ad9a7423915b7

on August 23, 2013
at 06:56 PM

I should also point out some recent research indicating that Epstein-Barr virus may play a role in egg allergy: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23289888

0
C676bb33548b1c8add2ad9a7423915b7

on August 23, 2013
at 05:49 PM

I appear to have serious problems with spicy foods, especially anything "hot." I am of Northern European origin; ingestion of anything spicy, including ordinary black pepper, makes me exceedingly uncomfortable with increased GI symptoms (atrophic gastritis), worsened rosacea, and excruciating eye pain. Bottom line, I concur that spices may contribute to inflammation in sensitive people, and I add that this may be a matter of genotype. This is a great author to read more on this subject: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=fumagalli+selective+pressure

0
C8586fa2188272d5474d22aa8a500619

on August 28, 2012
at 04:28 AM

In order to have a strong reaction from food you need two thing to meet in your intestines within certain time 1. agent that promotes leaky gut AND 2. foods that can cross the intestinal barrier to your bloodstream and cause inflammation and/or immune system reaction

Hot spices (www.leakygutresearch.com/hot-spices-leaky-gut/) fall into the first group, eggs into the second.

I know of another combination that when consuming the foods alone is harmless, when combined gives me a reacion: coffee (www.leakygutresearch.com/leaky-gut-and-coffee/) and milk.

-3
963322f175cdd4c5f7d52cc372b3a167

on August 26, 2012
at 07:55 AM

I don't know about effects on intestinal permeability, but I know they've been PROVEN to reduce the risk of most STDs - to say nothing of preventing pregnancy. For that reason alone I think they should be made widely available to ANYONE who is sexually active. Just sayin'.

963322f175cdd4c5f7d52cc372b3a167

(646)

on August 29, 2012
at 02:10 AM

Get a sense of humor, dude.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on August 28, 2012
at 10:11 AM

wtf are you talking about?

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