2

votes

Can we battle allergies head on, beating them at their own game?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 18, 2011 at 8:45 PM

Stephen-Aegis included in an answer from last year the following quote:

"In my opinion Gut Health should be priority #1. With that taken care of, many allergies simply disappear."

This reminds me of a related comment I saw from Dr Art Ayers' Cooling Inflammation blog:

"Also remember that food "allergies" are usually food intolerances that are caused by lacking the bacteria needed to digest plant polysaccharides. In most cases, these intolerances are best overcome by persistent eating of the food with associated bacteria. For example, most people eliminate lactose intolerance by simply eating live yogurt for a couple of weeks. It is usually that simple, but both the food and new bacteria are needed for a normal gut bacterial community of hundreds of different bacterial species."

While other threads discuss gut health and probiotics and the like, I am wondering if Dr Ayers brings up an interesting point that maybe many people do not experiment with in the right way.

Most people try to eliminate the food associated with the allergy, believing that their body simply will never be able to handle that type of food... makes sense, right? But here, Dr Ayers is advocating that we might be able to beat it at it's own game, almost like ambushing it from the side by intentionally cultivating the right kind of gut bacteria specific to the allergic reaction.... actually beating the allergy.

Has anyone successfully done this?

E91fd339d760ed76cc72570a679ebf5a

(2369)

on March 19, 2011
at 06:34 PM

Theresa, lately I've been taking BioKult and/or ThreeLac which are both pretty pricey.

Ab19df3ededa28f7bf7daeba8435b205

(1471)

on March 19, 2011
at 02:46 AM

What specific brands of probiotics do you take and appx price? thx

0adda19045a3641edac0008364b91110

(1146)

on March 19, 2011
at 12:50 AM

I know. I am just anal.

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on March 19, 2011
at 12:35 AM

see! this is why I wanted to ask. because I wanted to get perspective and even testimonies from you all. I wonder why Art would say exactly that, and even as I read it, I thought dang... if it's that easy, why don't more people succeed? maybe he threw the lactose thing in there as an example but should have used a different one.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on March 19, 2011
at 12:09 AM

Melissa: funny enough, I'm the only lactose intolerant person in my family, even though we're about as Indian as possible. I've seen stats showing about a 80-90% prevalence of intolerance in Indians, with higher intolerance the less "white" your Indian family is. My gene test results showed that I'm likely descended from haplotypes that have been in India for a long long time, so the milk-loving family thing is strange. Maybe I'm adopted!

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on March 19, 2011
at 12:05 AM

Melissa and Paul: The Art Ayers quote in the original post is mixing up terms, as you've noted. Lactards like me don't have an allergic response to eating lactose. Sometimes I don't understand what Art is saying, and this is one of those times. As Paul noted, lactose is not up or down regulated to a significant extent in adulthood. And as Melissa has noted several times in the past, probiotics don't mean that you get permanant colonization in your gut. I've tried milk challenges several times and the results have been unpleasant, regardless of my yogurt-status.

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on March 18, 2011
at 11:35 PM

well there's a lot of Paleo folk eatin ghee so we all gonna die!

0adda19045a3641edac0008364b91110

(1146)

on March 18, 2011
at 11:29 PM

I can tolerate Ghee but I avoid due to the scare of oxidized cholesterol.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on March 18, 2011
at 10:54 PM

Too bad because those items have huge aging benefits.

47a42b6be94caf700fce9509e38bb6a4

(9647)

on March 18, 2011
at 10:54 PM

@Melissa: I think the OP invited the discussion of the related topic of intolerance, because of the bit about lactose intolerance in the question. But you're right of course.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on March 18, 2011
at 10:53 PM

This comes from homeopathy which believes if you dilute the offending agent enough it is curative to the host. No data backs this up however in homeopathy

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on March 18, 2011
at 10:52 PM

This is my number one goal in my practice......and not just for allergy. It is medically prudent to do.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on March 18, 2011
at 10:42 PM

that's not really an allergy, that's an intolerance. I've had the same experience. There is a reason your Indian and my Jewish ancestors fermented all their dairy.

47a42b6be94caf700fce9509e38bb6a4

(9647)

on March 18, 2011
at 09:45 PM

Of course there could be a sneaky backdoor way, but I thought it was more or less established that lactase activity doesn't change with increased lactose consumption. (Here you can see the opposite, mice don't *stop* making lactase any sooner when you remove the lactose: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9881268) Sucrase production on the other hand can increase and decrease with intake. ... Not saying of course that there isn't some other way to restore lactose tolerance, but this seems a more difficult task than, say, getting rid of asthma with clean paleo eating and sleeping.

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on March 18, 2011
at 09:33 PM

are you certain of this though Kamal?... as far as never being able to drink milk? I'm not questioning your experiences. Not at all. I just wonder if there is a way, but that maybe it's just difficult to nail down just right, and maybe the methods you have tried just aren't down the right path.

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on March 18, 2011
at 09:30 PM

rob - are you able to tolerate ghee? i know that doesn't address my question here, as that would be along the avoidance approach, but I was just wondering :)

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3 Answers

2
E91fd339d760ed76cc72570a679ebf5a

(2369)

on March 18, 2011
at 10:21 PM

My allium intolerance (which I developed as an adult) forced me to avoid all onions, garlic, leeks, chives, etc. for 8 years or so, even when eating paleo. Since I started using probiotics and digestive enzymes and adrenal support I suddenly seem able to eat them in small quantities without getting sick. It's amazing! Next up... GLUTEN?

Ab19df3ededa28f7bf7daeba8435b205

(1471)

on March 19, 2011
at 02:46 AM

What specific brands of probiotics do you take and appx price? thx

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on March 18, 2011
at 10:54 PM

Too bad because those items have huge aging benefits.

E91fd339d760ed76cc72570a679ebf5a

(2369)

on March 19, 2011
at 06:34 PM

Theresa, lately I've been taking BioKult and/or ThreeLac which are both pretty pricey.

1
21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on March 18, 2011
at 08:56 PM

"For example, most people eliminate lactose intolerance by simply eating live yogurt for a couple of weeks."

I'm not sure where Art gets this from, but it is definitely not true for me. No matter how many lactose-loving bacteria take up residence in my gut, I'll never be able to drink 2-3 glasses of milk a day like I could as a child.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on March 18, 2011
at 10:42 PM

that's not really an allergy, that's an intolerance. I've had the same experience. There is a reason your Indian and my Jewish ancestors fermented all their dairy.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on March 19, 2011
at 12:05 AM

Melissa and Paul: The Art Ayers quote in the original post is mixing up terms, as you've noted. Lactards like me don't have an allergic response to eating lactose. Sometimes I don't understand what Art is saying, and this is one of those times. As Paul noted, lactose is not up or down regulated to a significant extent in adulthood. And as Melissa has noted several times in the past, probiotics don't mean that you get permanant colonization in your gut. I've tried milk challenges several times and the results have been unpleasant, regardless of my yogurt-status.

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on March 18, 2011
at 09:33 PM

are you certain of this though Kamal?... as far as never being able to drink milk? I'm not questioning your experiences. Not at all. I just wonder if there is a way, but that maybe it's just difficult to nail down just right, and maybe the methods you have tried just aren't down the right path.

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on March 19, 2011
at 12:35 AM

see! this is why I wanted to ask. because I wanted to get perspective and even testimonies from you all. I wonder why Art would say exactly that, and even as I read it, I thought dang... if it's that easy, why don't more people succeed? maybe he threw the lactose thing in there as an example but should have used a different one.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on March 18, 2011
at 10:53 PM

This comes from homeopathy which believes if you dilute the offending agent enough it is curative to the host. No data backs this up however in homeopathy

47a42b6be94caf700fce9509e38bb6a4

(9647)

on March 18, 2011
at 10:54 PM

@Melissa: I think the OP invited the discussion of the related topic of intolerance, because of the bit about lactose intolerance in the question. But you're right of course.

47a42b6be94caf700fce9509e38bb6a4

(9647)

on March 18, 2011
at 09:45 PM

Of course there could be a sneaky backdoor way, but I thought it was more or less established that lactase activity doesn't change with increased lactose consumption. (Here you can see the opposite, mice don't *stop* making lactase any sooner when you remove the lactose: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9881268) Sucrase production on the other hand can increase and decrease with intake. ... Not saying of course that there isn't some other way to restore lactose tolerance, but this seems a more difficult task than, say, getting rid of asthma with clean paleo eating and sleeping.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on March 19, 2011
at 12:09 AM

Melissa: funny enough, I'm the only lactose intolerant person in my family, even though we're about as Indian as possible. I've seen stats showing about a 80-90% prevalence of intolerance in Indians, with higher intolerance the less "white" your Indian family is. My gene test results showed that I'm likely descended from haplotypes that have been in India for a long long time, so the milk-loving family thing is strange. Maybe I'm adopted!

0
0adda19045a3641edac0008364b91110

(1146)

on March 18, 2011
at 09:17 PM

I am experimenting at the moment with that theory. So far I can't seem to tolerate butter at all, stinky gas, but I am able to tolerate sour cream in large amounts fine. I'll keep experimenting.

0adda19045a3641edac0008364b91110

(1146)

on March 19, 2011
at 12:50 AM

I know. I am just anal.

0adda19045a3641edac0008364b91110

(1146)

on March 18, 2011
at 11:29 PM

I can tolerate Ghee but I avoid due to the scare of oxidized cholesterol.

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on March 18, 2011
at 09:30 PM

rob - are you able to tolerate ghee? i know that doesn't address my question here, as that would be along the avoidance approach, but I was just wondering :)

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on March 18, 2011
at 11:35 PM

well there's a lot of Paleo folk eatin ghee so we all gonna die!

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