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Does Agave Nectar degrade to fructose with conventional home baking?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created September 07, 2013 at 12:44 AM

Does Agave Nectar degrade to fructose with conventional home baking? I read the inulin answers, but agave nectar is not "pure" inulin. It's a combo of fructose (mostly) and some glucose bound in polysaccaride chains. My understanding that at room to body temps, it's partially degraded (at any glucose-fructose bonds, but not at fructose-fructose bonds except maybe if intestinal flora degrade those bonds). But if I bake (about 350 degrees F) veggies with Agave Nectar, am I ending up with more fructose (molecular, as a mono-saccharide) than I stared with? Thanks for any info!

510bdda8988ed0d4b0ec0b738b4edb73

(20888)

on September 18, 2011
at 04:31 AM

Yeah Agave Nectar should just be called high fructose agave syrup. It's 90% fructose and that's how your body sees it.

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on September 17, 2011
at 07:32 PM

Most of the fructose is unbound like that in HFCS. It's likely a mixture of fructose, glucose and sucrose. It doesn't matter if it degrades during cooking, because the weak glycosidic bonds in sucrose are cleaved during absorption.

510bdda8988ed0d4b0ec0b738b4edb73

(20888)

on September 18, 2011
at 04:31 AM

Yeah Agave Nectar should just be called high fructose agave syrup. It's 90% fructose and that's how your body sees it.

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