6

votes

Is eating Paleo congruent for longevity? Thoughts?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 06, 2011 at 6:41 PM

Many find refuge in eating with an evolutionary trend. But the point of a paleolithic diet is to increase the survivability of the next generation or offspring. That is the entire point of adaptation. Many people adopt paleo post child bearing and are hoping that this method of eating will increase health, decrease disease, and keep them free from healthcare as they age. I have many thoughts about this question but those may come later. I am more interested in hearing other views both pro and con. I think the question is an open one but there are somethings in anti aging medicine that point to certain qualities that one should shoot for. Some are decidedly un-paleo ironically. What say you?

F040035b2008ec80b205481afbd39ad4

(1837)

on March 16, 2011
at 10:13 AM

Lindsay - Good pictures! I was suggesting that 'paleo' might not necessarily increase longevity. Keys was no where near paleo and made it to 100 and some paleo guys think that paleo WILL get them to 100 (at least). I don't think any of us would want to get to 100 looking like a bag of jelly as Keys did! Robb Wolf made a great comment (similar to one I have read a few times on TTP), that there is a trade-off between Longevity, Health and Elite Performance.

Eea4c0f072bb5caa74c1fbe6dfab5f46

(942)

on March 13, 2011
at 12:16 AM

Have you seen pics of Ancel Keys when he died??http://changinghabits.com.au/images/newsletter/Ancel%20Keys%20100%20years.jpg Jack Lalanne died at 96 -- http://www.djproject.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/Jack-LaLanne.jpg

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on March 10, 2011
at 10:47 PM

Maybe, maybe not. There is going to be a goldielocks zone. But I think that gelatin is much more useful than it is a detriment. Glycine is ballin'.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on March 07, 2011
at 01:28 PM

there is another book I read.....give me time to think of the title......

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on March 07, 2011
at 01:27 PM

read John Hawks blog about it. He is very eloquent in this area.

C0887358ae041723ba426a6ad4732cfc

on March 07, 2011
at 09:47 AM

Stabby, I too am trying to restrict protein to 10%-15%, but I also eat bone broth, which has gelatin. Gelatin may have no methionine, but it does have cysteine, of which methionine is an intermediate. (It's also an intermediate for carnitine, taurine, and few others.) Is the cysteine a cause for concern? Is it known what specifically methionine does that affects aging?

0bca55dd53e259958c4b560dc12c936d

on March 07, 2011
at 04:59 AM

Please explain this one...fat accumulation? It is something I think about. It also troubles me that type two DM seems to protect us from global cooling. For more Paleo hacks: http://paleohacks.com/questions/26195/is-eating-paleo-congruent-for-longevity-thoughts#ixzz1Ft2T1IcY

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on March 07, 2011
at 01:51 AM

Yeah I know. And carnitine, and it contains carnosine, ALA, and it promotes expesient apoptosis, dejunks the liver, boosts glucagon, adiponectin, probably a ton more. I did say it was useful. Then we're in agreement that there is an optimal range. Granted it probably isn't 10%, although that's what the guys at Perfect Health Diet are advocating.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on March 07, 2011
at 01:17 AM

But Stabby we also know as we eat more protein glutiathione production matches it. But we dont know the dose response curve over a life time.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on March 07, 2011
at 01:16 AM

There is alot of data about hangovers being made better by aspargus juicing and smoothies. You can google it to see I am correct. The reason it works is because cooked aspargus has very high levels of glutathione which helps the liver detox the booze the next day. Wish I knew this in college.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on March 07, 2011
at 12:59 AM

It quickly neutralizes lipid peroxides — nasty, dangerous breakdown products of the delicate and precious polyunsaturated fatty acids found in our cell membranes. On top of all these antioxidant functions, our cells use glutathione to make drugs and toxic chemicals more water-soluble so they can be excreted. Without glutathione, the antioxidant system breaks down, and toxic chemicals hang around to wreak havoc in our cells and tissues.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on March 07, 2011
at 12:58 AM

Ignacio this is from Masterjohn at WPF. read it to understand better. Glutathione maintains vitamins C and E in their reduced, active forms. It tightly regulates the production of hydrogen peroxide, which is a valuable signaling compound in small amounts but which promotes oxidative destruction of the cellular machinery in larger amounts.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on March 07, 2011
at 12:48 AM

ROS stress our antioxident systems. This one is the major one in the liver. There are companies now selling transdermal patches of this substance. I once thought it was nuts now I study it more. Maybe they are ahead of the curve?

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on March 07, 2011
at 12:45 AM

I also think we have to look at humans who have actually conquered the neolithic issues best. The arabs coming from the fertile crescent have eaten grains for the last 10,000 yrs and have adapted well from it. That is evolution in motion.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on March 07, 2011
at 12:42 AM

mathematics tell us that humans are actually evolving faster than any other species because of our shear numbers. I wonder about the unintended consequences of that and I wonder if neolithic diseases etiologies is not the method that allows this in some way. Populations that evolved around the fertile crescent have adapted best to grain biochemistry while Euroasians have faired much worse. It is something I think about. It also troubles me that type two DM seems to protect us from global cooling. And we know that ice ages have occured several times since we evolved.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on March 07, 2011
at 12:39 AM

Lots of things to say here.....but I think apoptosis trigger protein NF kappa beta is tied to our sex steroids. It is about suicide and sex and power ultimately in my view.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on March 07, 2011
at 12:38 AM

Hormones play a huge rule in extending the Hayslip number and lengthening telomeres and making our mitochondria less leaky. I still find the Cornell experiments of 1930 compelling. We can learn a lot by thinking about those experiments and what we are learning about resveratrol

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on March 07, 2011
at 12:35 AM

LOL......long enough to spread the greatest lie ever.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on March 07, 2011
at 12:34 AM

StaBBY I did not mean paleo has rules because I believe it does not. But getting 10% of calories only from protein is 3.0 standard deviations from the mean on most calorie breakdowns since we know you can get a ton from carbs. Its a very fair question unless your an Inuit.

Ac1e55cf06c2180f4008ff01953d10dd

(3524)

on March 07, 2011
at 12:32 AM

what is it exactly that stresses glutiathione? is it very low carb paleo? is that what you call "strict paleo" or something else?

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on March 07, 2011
at 12:29 AM

Eating strict paleo stresses glutiathione so I think at some point that issue will need to be studied long term. I think how it effects mitochondria may effect longevity and ultimately shorten our telomeres. I think Paleo is best for survival of the species but I am not sure we know it long term effects on longevity. I wonder as I read what alterations we may have to make as we age to make our mitochondria less leaky and live even longer. The mTor question and how reservatrol acts really intrigues me. Lots of questions yet to be answered by science.

Ac1e55cf06c2180f4008ff01953d10dd

(3524)

on March 06, 2011
at 10:59 PM

Dr.K which elements of the paleo diet do you believe that are inconvenient for longevity

Ac1e55cf06c2180f4008ff01953d10dd

(3524)

on March 06, 2011
at 10:59 PM

Dr.K which elements of the paleo diet you believe that are inconvenient for longevity

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on March 06, 2011
at 10:53 PM

The point is that whether or not higher or lower protein is better, paleo isn't affected since paleo can be high or low protein. High fat, lower carb with animal products includes is still better than anything else available. I suppose my diet is closer to 15%, actually. Due to the gelatin. Gelatin has no methionine or tryptophan - the usually implicated proteins in accelerated aging. 10% represents proteins containing those.

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on March 06, 2011
at 10:51 PM

All in all, paleo is not hindered by protein in terms of longevity. High fat with animal products is still better than low fat without, and if someone wants more protein for muscles there is gelatin which has no tryptophan or methionine - to the commonly implicated amino acids. You could call my diet closer to 15% if we included gelatin.

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on March 06, 2011
at 10:49 PM

Simply because paleo man tended to eat more protein does not follow that it is optimal for longevity. Protein would confer a momentary survival benefit through improved wound healing, food availability, and perhaps others, but it doesn't follow that it would be the best in the long-term. That is not to say that c10% is any better than 20% is any better than 30% - the jury is still out. But I don't accept that evolution always works for longevity all of the time and it is demonstrably true that a 10% protein diet is sustainable indefinitely, so that's what I'm trying right now.

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on March 06, 2011
at 10:44 PM

Purpose according to whom? Evolution? Your genes? These things may behavior in a purposeful way because we are prone to anthropomorphism but how in the world does it follow that anyone ought to hold themselves to reproducing if their lives wouldn't be better for it? The purpose one ought to hold oneself to - one's own purpose, is to live a fulfilling life. 10% protein is still paleo. I look at paleo as the types of foods consumed, not necessarily their composition. My diet is 70% fat, 20% carbs and 10% protein, meat, fish eggs, coconut, olive oil, veggies including tubers and a bit of fruit.

F040035b2008ec80b205481afbd39ad4

(1837)

on March 06, 2011
at 10:09 PM

Even Ancel Keys made it to 100! http://www.proteinpower.com/drmike/wp-content/uploads/2007/11/keys-aged.jpg

2f54dbe892ec89b12d1db686568e885a

(919)

on March 06, 2011
at 09:13 PM

I am defying gravity as long as possible.............

2f54dbe892ec89b12d1db686568e885a

(919)

on March 06, 2011
at 09:10 PM

And what is the purpose of life, if not the procreation of the species ?

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on March 06, 2011
at 08:45 PM

10% protein on paleo? That sounds decidely unpaleo no? How do you explain it. Are you just eating fat?

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on March 06, 2011
at 08:40 PM

My meals are either 4 free range eggs and a quarter lb of fatty lamb or lamb and salmon, plus veggies to the tune of 60g of protein a day. That provides all the benefits of these foods without the excess protein.

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on March 06, 2011
at 08:39 PM

It remains to be said what the optimal protein intake is. Ask Robb Wold, Cordain and Mike Eades and they will give you a ton of info on the benefits of high protein like 30% of cals. I personally advocate a high protein diet for anyone overcoming a metabolic malady. That being said the guys at Perfect Health Diet calculated it at about 10-15 for longevity to get the best of both worlds. There is definitely a lot more to aging than mTOR. Protein is very useful but too much for too long makes you old. However just look at Sisson and Devany.. They aren't getting old an high protein.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on March 06, 2011
at 08:37 PM

interesting take. I have different goals

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on March 06, 2011
at 07:12 PM

That is certainly not to say that I disapprove of others reproducing or want their children to be anything but healthy and long-lived, I just don't think it is a necessary stipulation of living a good life.

  • Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

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6 Answers

4
Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on March 06, 2011
at 07:06 PM

I never want to propagate my genes, and I don't think that our point should necessarily be to do so. Do we really want to be genetic puppets catering to the anthropomorphic whim of replicators that behave in a goal-directed way? Of course not, or else we would all have as many children as we could reasonably afford.

Having said that I do want to live a very long life and I want my significant other to live longer, so I will always go for the best long-term strategy.

Pros of Paleo

Little inflammation Amazing metabolic health Reducing of oxidative stress (largly due to the above two but also Excellent maintainence of age-affected biochemicals (glutathione, carnitine, muscle mass, bone density and strength) Lower carb paleo seems to be good for the brain, de-junking cells, and reducing AGES Great nutrient status

There is probably more. It's just not a very aging diet.

Possible cons

There is the issue of methionine's activation of mTOR which replicates cells prematurely, I think. However my paleo diet is really only about 10% protein right now and 15% with the difference made up of methionine-less gelatin on a workout day. So that isn't a necessary condition.

We need an objective, unbias protein debate.

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on March 06, 2011
at 10:51 PM

All in all, paleo is not hindered by protein in terms of longevity. High fat with animal products is still better than low fat without, and if someone wants more protein for muscles there is gelatin which has no tryptophan or methionine - to the commonly implicated amino acids. You could call my diet closer to 15% if we included gelatin.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on March 07, 2011
at 12:34 AM

StaBBY I did not mean paleo has rules because I believe it does not. But getting 10% of calories only from protein is 3.0 standard deviations from the mean on most calorie breakdowns since we know you can get a ton from carbs. Its a very fair question unless your an Inuit.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on March 06, 2011
at 08:45 PM

10% protein on paleo? That sounds decidely unpaleo no? How do you explain it. Are you just eating fat?

2f54dbe892ec89b12d1db686568e885a

(919)

on March 06, 2011
at 09:10 PM

And what is the purpose of life, if not the procreation of the species ?

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on March 07, 2011
at 01:51 AM

Yeah I know. And carnitine, and it contains carnosine, ALA, and it promotes expesient apoptosis, dejunks the liver, boosts glucagon, adiponectin, probably a ton more. I did say it was useful. Then we're in agreement that there is an optimal range. Granted it probably isn't 10%, although that's what the guys at Perfect Health Diet are advocating.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on March 07, 2011
at 01:17 AM

But Stabby we also know as we eat more protein glutiathione production matches it. But we dont know the dose response curve over a life time.

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on March 06, 2011
at 07:12 PM

That is certainly not to say that I disapprove of others reproducing or want their children to be anything but healthy and long-lived, I just don't think it is a necessary stipulation of living a good life.

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on March 06, 2011
at 10:44 PM

Purpose according to whom? Evolution? Your genes? These things may behavior in a purposeful way because we are prone to anthropomorphism but how in the world does it follow that anyone ought to hold themselves to reproducing if their lives wouldn't be better for it? The purpose one ought to hold oneself to - one's own purpose, is to live a fulfilling life. 10% protein is still paleo. I look at paleo as the types of foods consumed, not necessarily their composition. My diet is 70% fat, 20% carbs and 10% protein, meat, fish eggs, coconut, olive oil, veggies including tubers and a bit of fruit.

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on March 06, 2011
at 10:49 PM

Simply because paleo man tended to eat more protein does not follow that it is optimal for longevity. Protein would confer a momentary survival benefit through improved wound healing, food availability, and perhaps others, but it doesn't follow that it would be the best in the long-term. That is not to say that c10% is any better than 20% is any better than 30% - the jury is still out. But I don't accept that evolution always works for longevity all of the time and it is demonstrably true that a 10% protein diet is sustainable indefinitely, so that's what I'm trying right now.

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on March 06, 2011
at 10:53 PM

The point is that whether or not higher or lower protein is better, paleo isn't affected since paleo can be high or low protein. High fat, lower carb with animal products includes is still better than anything else available. I suppose my diet is closer to 15%, actually. Due to the gelatin. Gelatin has no methionine or tryptophan - the usually implicated proteins in accelerated aging. 10% represents proteins containing those.

C0887358ae041723ba426a6ad4732cfc

on March 07, 2011
at 09:47 AM

Stabby, I too am trying to restrict protein to 10%-15%, but I also eat bone broth, which has gelatin. Gelatin may have no methionine, but it does have cysteine, of which methionine is an intermediate. (It's also an intermediate for carnitine, taurine, and few others.) Is the cysteine a cause for concern? Is it known what specifically methionine does that affects aging?

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on March 10, 2011
at 10:47 PM

Maybe, maybe not. There is going to be a goldielocks zone. But I think that gelatin is much more useful than it is a detriment. Glycine is ballin'.

1
1acc4ee9381d9a8d998b59915b3f997e

(2099)

on March 06, 2011
at 10:05 PM

I think we evolved longevity to make sure that children can be raised in an optimum setting. It takes a long time to raise a human being to adulthood, and if something happens to the parents, who better to take care of the child than its grandparents? Plus, older people used to be storage houses of wisdom and knowlege...just look at the esteem in which tribal peoples hold their old folks, or read the Foxfire books to see what I mean.

0bca55dd53e259958c4b560dc12c936d

on March 07, 2011
at 04:59 AM

Please explain this one...fat accumulation? It is something I think about. It also troubles me that type two DM seems to protect us from global cooling. For more Paleo hacks: http://paleohacks.com/questions/26195/is-eating-paleo-congruent-for-longevity-thoughts#ixzz1Ft2T1IcY

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on March 07, 2011
at 01:28 PM

there is another book I read.....give me time to think of the title......

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on March 07, 2011
at 12:42 AM

mathematics tell us that humans are actually evolving faster than any other species because of our shear numbers. I wonder about the unintended consequences of that and I wonder if neolithic diseases etiologies is not the method that allows this in some way. Populations that evolved around the fertile crescent have adapted best to grain biochemistry while Euroasians have faired much worse. It is something I think about. It also troubles me that type two DM seems to protect us from global cooling. And we know that ice ages have occured several times since we evolved.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on March 07, 2011
at 01:27 PM

read John Hawks blog about it. He is very eloquent in this area.

1
4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on March 06, 2011
at 09:10 PM

Men are fertile into old-age. Women, unlike other female primates, evolved to undergo menopause. Clearly, we didn't evolve to simply die at 35 years old after rearing kids.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on March 07, 2011
at 12:39 AM

Lots of things to say here.....but I think apoptosis trigger protein NF kappa beta is tied to our sex steroids. It is about suicide and sex and power ultimately in my view.

1
F040035b2008ec80b205481afbd39ad4

on March 06, 2011
at 08:11 PM

I'd suggest 'paleo' manifests itself most favourably in 'compressed morbidity' rather than longevity.

This is the way I would like my life to pan out. Personally I'd much prefer 80 healthy years followed by a rapid decline, rather than the slow and steady decline that greets modern man in his 40s (if not younger) and makes the next 40 an exercise in 'survival' rather than 'living'.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on March 06, 2011
at 08:37 PM

interesting take. I have different goals

2f54dbe892ec89b12d1db686568e885a

(919)

on March 06, 2011
at 09:13 PM

I am defying gravity as long as possible.............

F040035b2008ec80b205481afbd39ad4

(1837)

on March 06, 2011
at 10:09 PM

Even Ancel Keys made it to 100! http://www.proteinpower.com/drmike/wp-content/uploads/2007/11/keys-aged.jpg

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on March 07, 2011
at 12:35 AM

LOL......long enough to spread the greatest lie ever.

Eea4c0f072bb5caa74c1fbe6dfab5f46

(942)

on March 13, 2011
at 12:16 AM

Have you seen pics of Ancel Keys when he died??http://changinghabits.com.au/images/newsletter/Ancel%20Keys%20100%20years.jpg Jack Lalanne died at 96 -- http://www.djproject.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/Jack-LaLanne.jpg

F040035b2008ec80b205481afbd39ad4

(1837)

on March 16, 2011
at 10:13 AM

Lindsay - Good pictures! I was suggesting that 'paleo' might not necessarily increase longevity. Keys was no where near paleo and made it to 100 and some paleo guys think that paleo WILL get them to 100 (at least). I don't think any of us would want to get to 100 looking like a bag of jelly as Keys did! Robb Wolf made a great comment (similar to one I have read a few times on TTP), that there is a trade-off between Longevity, Health and Elite Performance.

0
7e65e7c3794834b3526b77f92cabee55

(214)

on March 07, 2011
at 07:23 AM

This idea seems to conflate diet with evolution when they are not strictly the same. The point of adaptation is to get your genes into the next generation. But does that mean this is the "point" of a paleolithic diet? From our historical point of view at the receiving end of a long line of successful reproducers, we may skew the value of our ancestor's diet to being something that insured we were here to talk about it.

But essentially diet is to let you thrive. That should help improve your (sexual) fitness - the chance your genes get passed on. But whether they do or not seems irrelevant to the "purpose" of the diet. When you thrive, if this health is not somehow spent, in part, in the cost of reproduction, perhaps you will live ever so lightly longer longer... with the evolutionary "hope" to reproduce one fine day!

Many of us will go on to destroy our ancestors perfect reproductive track record... I know I will. But we will still benefit in other ways from a full healthy life. That is not to say we will not trip over non-paleo tricks to let us live even longer. But paleo, to me at least, is not incongruent with a quest for longevity.

But I am curious if your question hints at another evolutionary impact. We know that modern civilization and the growth in technology came with agriculture. Is there anything inherit in the change in diets that would have encouraged this technological evolution or is it simply the outcome of more minds freed up by the stratification of labor? IE: Does the modern diet make you smarter?!

0
Medium avatar

on March 06, 2011
at 07:18 PM

The SAD is high toxin, low nutrition. It just so happens that paleo is the opposite, and with some tweaks can be very strongly skewed toward high nutrition, low toxin.

I still wonder about some aspects of a more natural path, vitamin D being one of them. I think it's possible that supplemental vitamin D may be preferable (longevity-wise) compared to daily exposure to UV radiation, but I have no data to back that up, just a hunch. Obviously you never want to get close to getting a sunburn, but potential genetic damage may be occurring with every dose. Clearly the need for D far outweighs the risk for a HG, but we may find out much later that decades of exposure was unwise, and at that point it may be too late.

Like Stabby, I too am concerned about excess protein and the ammonia generated via deamination, but I'm not certain that I really have an alternate route, though I could just discard all egg whites or something along those lines.

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on March 06, 2011
at 08:39 PM

It remains to be said what the optimal protein intake is. Ask Robb Wold, Cordain and Mike Eades and they will give you a ton of info on the benefits of high protein like 30% of cals. I personally advocate a high protein diet for anyone overcoming a metabolic malady. That being said the guys at Perfect Health Diet calculated it at about 10-15 for longevity to get the best of both worlds. There is definitely a lot more to aging than mTOR. Protein is very useful but too much for too long makes you old. However just look at Sisson and Devany.. They aren't getting old an high protein.

Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on March 06, 2011
at 08:40 PM

My meals are either 4 free range eggs and a quarter lb of fatty lamb or lamb and salmon, plus veggies to the tune of 60g of protein a day. That provides all the benefits of these foods without the excess protein.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on March 07, 2011
at 12:38 AM

Hormones play a huge rule in extending the Hayslip number and lengthening telomeres and making our mitochondria less leaky. I still find the Cornell experiments of 1930 compelling. We can learn a lot by thinking about those experiments and what we are learning about resveratrol

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