1

votes

Why do we use an acidic medium like ACV to get rid of phytic acid when soaking nuts?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created May 19, 2012 at 4:02 PM

If ACV is acidic, wouldn't it make more sense to use something alkaline like plain baking soda to get rid of the phytic acid? How exactly does using water or ACV/lemon juice/whatever remove phytic acid? Is it due to the solubility of phytate in water or something more complex?

Someone care to elucidate this matter?

7dc950fc76a046048e683d2a27dced37

on May 19, 2012
at 06:50 PM

Phytase breaks down phytic acid. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phytase

0a9ad4e577fe24a6b8aafa1dd7a50c79

(5150)

on May 19, 2012
at 06:23 PM

So it's more about activating phytase than it is reducing phytic acid? Still doesn't explain how phytic acid is reduced.

Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

2 Answers

3
7dc950fc76a046048e683d2a27dced37

on May 19, 2012
at 04:47 PM

According to the WAPF folks:

Soaking grains and flour in an acid medium at very warm temperatures, as in the sourdough process, also activates phytase and reduces or even eliminates phytic acid.

7dc950fc76a046048e683d2a27dced37

on May 19, 2012
at 06:50 PM

Phytase breaks down phytic acid. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phytase

0a9ad4e577fe24a6b8aafa1dd7a50c79

(5150)

on May 19, 2012
at 06:23 PM

So it's more about activating phytase than it is reducing phytic acid? Still doesn't explain how phytic acid is reduced.

0
345c1755efe005edd162b770dc6fb821

(8767)

on May 19, 2012
at 05:14 PM

I just use salt when soaking nuts, never anything else and only room temp water. So does the salt do the same to activate the phytase to reduce/eliminate phytic acid?

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!