3

votes

Is there a substitute for coconut flour?

Answered on March 31, 2016
Created May 23, 2011 at 2:54 AM

There are many recipes using coconut flour that I would like to use, but I don't have any and can't find any without ordering it online. I've got almond flour and chestnut flour that I have used for cookies/pancakes (not often, but a couple times in the last two months). Could I use one of those other flours in place of coconut and, if so, how might I need to change the recipes? More eggs? Butter? less/more cooking time? How does coconut flour compare to these other types of flours?

D5d982a898721d3392c85f951d0bf0aa

(2417)

on February 29, 2012
at 03:46 AM

No...they really are two different animals. And why would you use wheat flour? (It's a paleo board, after all). If you're going to bake with gluten, just pick a conventional recipe and save yourself some baking angst.

D5d982a898721d3392c85f951d0bf0aa

(2417)

on February 29, 2012
at 03:45 AM

Thank you for sharing your ratio! I'm going to give that a whack and see if I can figure out a ratio in grams. I've given up on GF baking by volume - I never get consistent results. Anyhow, your ratio sounds roughly correct to me, but I'd expect to need to add an egg here and there, or use a bit more fat. It's amazing how much liquid a little coconut flour can suck up.

D5d982a898721d3392c85f951d0bf0aa

(2417)

on February 29, 2012
at 03:43 AM

That's a starch. Probably paleo but definitely not a workable sub for coconut flour. If you want great info on stuff like this, you might want to check out some of the good gluten free baking websites. A lot of people have spent years analyzing the zillions of flours and starches. Arrowroot is different than tapioca is different than cornstarch (and so on) but they're roughly interchangeable. And as always, gluten free baking works best when measured by weight.

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on May 23, 2011
at 02:52 PM

There are many coconut free options here. http://www.paleofood.com/baked.htm

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on May 23, 2011
at 02:50 PM

For the brownie recipe I'd probably up the cocoa powder as that acts as a type of "flour". If this is the one with apple sauce then I'd maybe take that down a bit. Do not get rid of any eggs as they help bind the mix. I might do a first attempt just upping the almond flour and cocoa to make up the extra 1/4 cup and see what you end up. I suspect just a looser, more fudgey type brownie. If you don't like what you end up with then back to the drawing board.

3960d381831b80ad96164f34e2ab6030

(565)

on May 23, 2011
at 12:55 PM

I tried to find it, but they said they didn't have any. I wonder if different stores have different products.

3960d381831b80ad96164f34e2ab6030

(565)

on May 23, 2011
at 12:46 PM

What do you consider absorbent flours? What would be the closest to coconut flour? I would like to make the famous paleo cookies with both almond flour and coconut flour or paleo brownies with coconut flour and I'd like to find substitutes until I can order it.

C23ec4b85f3cbeb9ddf6bf78317d56e3

(300)

on May 23, 2011
at 03:50 AM

I got some coconut flour from Whole Foods, so if you can find one near you maybe they have some. I had to have a worker help me find it though, even though it was right in front of me the whole time... LOL

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on May 23, 2011
at 03:35 AM

that makes sense. All my recipes use only nut and coconut flours so you take out the coconut and you have a mess. Yes if you have other absorbent flours in the mix then I think it's fine to play around and leave out the coconut flour.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78437)

on May 23, 2011
at 03:32 AM

It probably depends on the recipe. I follow a ratio based method so whenever I see a recipe online or in a cookbook I always follow basic ratios and adjust accordingly. Steven didn't say what he was trying to make so it's hard to advise. Gluten free baking is kind of trial and error. I mostly adapt regular recipes using a variety of gluten free flours that I feel will work best for flavor profile I want in the final product. Coconut flour usually comprises a very small amount of flour in my baking so I don't know if it's absorbent qualities make it too unique for substitutions.

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13 Answers

best answer

1
1568416ef28477d1fa29046218d83ddd

(6235)

on May 23, 2011
at 04:11 PM

You can always get unsweetened dried coconut and mill it, either in a blender (tiny quantities so it moves), coffee grinder (best choice but clean it well and thow out your first batch if you use it for coffee) or with mortar and pestle. It is just super fine ground dried coconut, not something mysterious you have to buy.

53e10e72ec74eb0dee2224b004a3b2ab

(0)

on April 04, 2015
at 04:55 PM

You may have even forgotten that you made this comment.  It really helped me today!  Thanks!

3
98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

on May 23, 2011
at 03:23 AM

That's really hard to do. Coconut flour is pretty unique. For instance it is super absorbent whereas almond flour is not. I would instead look for nut flour recipes that you can tweak to make paleo if they aren't already (very easy to do). Almond flour was pretty much all anyone used until a few years ago when coconut flour became more popular so it's really easy to find great almond/nut flour recipes.

If you insist on using a recipe that calls for coconut flour you need to make sure to cut down on your wet ingredients somehow or you will have a soupy mess on your hands. Alternatively you could try doubling the amount of nut flour and keep the wet ingredients the same. I'm not recommending this mind you but if you must that's what I'd do.

(Laura and I must have been posting at the same time. My experience has been very different from hers but give it a try.)

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78437)

on May 23, 2011
at 03:32 AM

It probably depends on the recipe. I follow a ratio based method so whenever I see a recipe online or in a cookbook I always follow basic ratios and adjust accordingly. Steven didn't say what he was trying to make so it's hard to advise. Gluten free baking is kind of trial and error. I mostly adapt regular recipes using a variety of gluten free flours that I feel will work best for flavor profile I want in the final product. Coconut flour usually comprises a very small amount of flour in my baking so I don't know if it's absorbent qualities make it too unique for substitutions.

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on May 23, 2011
at 02:52 PM

There are many coconut free options here. http://www.paleofood.com/baked.htm

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on May 23, 2011
at 03:35 AM

that makes sense. All my recipes use only nut and coconut flours so you take out the coconut and you have a mess. Yes if you have other absorbent flours in the mix then I think it's fine to play around and leave out the coconut flour.

3960d381831b80ad96164f34e2ab6030

(565)

on May 23, 2011
at 12:46 PM

What do you consider absorbent flours? What would be the closest to coconut flour? I would like to make the famous paleo cookies with both almond flour and coconut flour or paleo brownies with coconut flour and I'd like to find substitutes until I can order it.

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on May 23, 2011
at 02:50 PM

For the brownie recipe I'd probably up the cocoa powder as that acts as a type of "flour". If this is the one with apple sauce then I'd maybe take that down a bit. Do not get rid of any eggs as they help bind the mix. I might do a first attempt just upping the almond flour and cocoa to make up the extra 1/4 cup and see what you end up. I suspect just a looser, more fudgey type brownie. If you don't like what you end up with then back to the drawing board.

2
Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on February 29, 2012
at 03:39 AM

As you posted this on May 23, my birthday!, and have over 2k views, with no upvote, I shall upvote you to celebrate the past 2011 Day of The Juba. Huzzah!

1
Cf5a9f26a193a938ad4ea7002e425069

on May 23, 2011
at 05:19 AM

Coconut flour soaks up liquid like crazy, hence Shari's soupy mess. Better to look up a different recipe that uses nut flour, or just get the coconut flour online - I buy mine through Amazon in bulk, and it lasts a while. I use a lot of recipes from Elana's Pantry, and also use a general sub of 3:1 of almond:coconut flour for regular flour - ie., sub for 1 cup of wheat flour is 3/4c almond and 1/4c coconut, without adjusting the wet ingredients much (or adding a bit of water). Good luck!

D5d982a898721d3392c85f951d0bf0aa

(2417)

on February 29, 2012
at 03:45 AM

Thank you for sharing your ratio! I'm going to give that a whack and see if I can figure out a ratio in grams. I've given up on GF baking by volume - I never get consistent results. Anyhow, your ratio sounds roughly correct to me, but I'd expect to need to add an egg here and there, or use a bit more fat. It's amazing how much liquid a little coconut flour can suck up.

1
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78437)

on May 23, 2011
at 03:22 AM

Yes you can use those nut flours as well as others instead of coconut flour. I would use both of them and perhaps add some tapioca starch as well for chewiness in your finished product. Don't really need to change the recipe as far as liquid or eggs or fat but realize that the flavor might be different in your recipe calling for coconut flour. Also I find that if the recipe is a risen item like muffins beating the whites of the eggs separately and folding them in gently gives me a better rise. Keep your nut flours in the freezer to increase their longevity. They can go rancid otherwise.

0
58615cd833a31248e7ff1d693f10c1db

on March 31, 2016
at 11:33 PM

Tiger nut flour

0
000e99eb56747d5ca157414fa1c7f9de

on November 23, 2014
at 09:09 PM

Holland and Barratt sell coconut flour.

0
7016404eef0e77dc610661bf596baefa

on May 16, 2014
at 05:51 PM

I also have a coconut allergy and I have wasted a lot of ingrediants due to failed substitutions. I am also allergic to tree nuts which makes paleo dessert recipes challenging. I did read that homemade sunflower seed flour is an almond flour substitute. I will try that, but I am searching for a good coconut flour substitute.

F77f065e4766c468602a04867eceb9ab

on November 23, 2014
at 03:02 PM

I too have a coconut allergy and some other nuts as well. Please post again if you find a good solution. 

0
78f6145aca7e4a3e43c291f45e390a4e

on July 28, 2013
at 01:23 PM

I also have a coconut allergy and so I"m trying to find substitutes for coconut flour.

0
Cdd03974b2bc7d79048185e052e59d8c

on June 17, 2013
at 12:26 AM

I have a coconut allergy as well and was wondering what I could use instead of coconut flour for any of the recipes? I found I could use olive oil instead of coconut oil, so Davis you can use that if it calls for coconut oil.

A673aa1cc3673f4f6de7e144646208a2

(0)

on February 25, 2015
at 01:15 AM

I have successfully substituted brown rice flour for coconut flower in one recipe on two different occasions. I had zero idea about how coconut flour absorbs liquid but both times the muffins turned out to be delicious and light. The batter was suspiciously runny but they turned out great. One note is that I did blend the eggs and bananas together in the Vitamix. Perhaps there was some air whipped in that contributed to the lightness.  

0
53e61c3a3fc84997305e40bae09471d8

on April 12, 2013
at 12:47 AM

OK so is there an answer I have a coconut allergy

0
Ea4483d1f75d104c585e31c18cdcb8bd

on February 29, 2012
at 01:56 AM

Is it possible to substitute wheat flour for the coconut flour and reduce the egg count? If so, what's the ratio?

D5d982a898721d3392c85f951d0bf0aa

(2417)

on February 29, 2012
at 03:46 AM

No...they really are two different animals. And why would you use wheat flour? (It's a paleo board, after all). If you're going to bake with gluten, just pick a conventional recipe and save yourself some baking angst.

0
8242ce52646612f9511299a82a78438a

on June 12, 2011
at 01:32 AM

what about arrowroot - where does that fit in? is it a substitute or is it even paleo?

C52067e27809ac751ba7e9c36ca2a5bc

on January 03, 2015
at 04:55 PM

Arrowroot is def paleo but I to wondered if it could be substituted for coconut flour. 

D5d982a898721d3392c85f951d0bf0aa

(2417)

on February 29, 2012
at 03:43 AM

That's a starch. Probably paleo but definitely not a workable sub for coconut flour. If you want great info on stuff like this, you might want to check out some of the good gluten free baking websites. A lot of people have spent years analyzing the zillions of flours and starches. Arrowroot is different than tapioca is different than cornstarch (and so on) but they're roughly interchangeable. And as always, gluten free baking works best when measured by weight.

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