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Is sleeping in a completely dark room really necessary?

Commented on April 02, 2014
Created March 31, 2014 at 10:43 PM

Is sleeping in a completely dark room really necessary?

Has anyone tried both and noticed a difference - if so do you think it was placebo?

The research on this stuff is unconvincing. Lights in the room are annoying, but light coming from outside can mimick the moon and isn't bad.

7b9b5de13a30c823dae64a971cb14add

(540)

on April 02, 2014
at 04:06 AM

my understanding that the shade/color of the light matters, so this would make sense. the blue light emitted by electronics/tv etc is supposedly more stimulating to the brain than yellow, amber etc.

1c0aedabf44b6ac40db8cf880b762c7a

(0)

on April 01, 2014
at 12:22 PM

Is there any good evidence that low light significantly impacts melatonin? especially if your eyes are closed?

59b1fb3c808957039f9ddf6fb341c05c

on April 01, 2014
at 08:40 AM

I absolutely can not sleep without earplugs...sound, even at its slightest overrides any kind of light for me.

543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on April 01, 2014
at 01:48 AM

could be age related as well...ie. when your young & unbreakable 'nothing' matters.

but as you get older we prob need to make sure we get good/bright light during the day & darkness during the night. possibly due to melatonin production getting screwed as we age, deterioration of eyesight & the pineal gland may be a factor/contributor as we age

543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on April 01, 2014
at 01:44 AM

too much (or too bright) moonlight (e.g. full moon) may not be so good...? think lunatic http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lunatic ...?

7904c7276d7e48f1be887fabd263bfd9

(300)

on April 01, 2014
at 12:18 AM

Everyone knows CAVEMEN slept in caves. They're not called PLANESMEN or TREESMEN, of course they evolved sleeping in the dark. :)

On a more serious note, it's not even what we 'evolved doing' it's really about what's ideal.

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6 Answers

0
86c97b2779feab3c330f5e1c5fea7e25

(2312)

on April 01, 2014
at 03:40 PM

If you are having problems sleeping then a dark room would be helpful...if you are sleeping fine then no need.

If it ain't broke, don't fix it. If it is broke, buy blackout blinds.

0
4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(4999)

on April 01, 2014
at 08:11 AM

I think it is a "fashion" rather than a need thing. I'm sure for one thing that, since the taming and use of fire, people would likely have slept near enough to a fire to be safe(r) from potential predators. And fires cast a fair bit of light...

Also, in many hot countries (even as far north as the Mediterranean) a sleep (siesta) during the hottest hours would be the norm - and that would have been three or four hours in bright light, just out of the direct sun or as deep a natural shade as could be found. Not dark!

I do find that in a dark room in the UK, while it makes no difference to going to sleep for me, I can be inclined to oversleep if the degree of light which I am used to isn't there to wake me.

I think eyelids do a pretty good job at keeping excess light out...

Now noise - that's a different thing. I do like a quiet bedroom.

0
Be803dcde63e3cf5e21cc121097b8158

on April 01, 2014
at 12:44 AM

Over the last couple of years I've tried the eyeshade and ear plugs.

For me, it's blocking out all sound that makes the biggest difference. For darkness, I just need a certain level, but certainly not completely blackness.

One interesting thing to note: Bright lights during the daytime (get outside!) affect melatonin secretion and quality of sleep at night.

59b1fb3c808957039f9ddf6fb341c05c

on April 01, 2014
at 08:40 AM

I absolutely can not sleep without earplugs...sound, even at its slightest overrides any kind of light for me.

0
F291857fa12a0291688ea994343156dc

(720)

on April 01, 2014
at 12:23 AM

For me it's a function of intensity..... low levels, moon or starlight levels are ok, very bright street lights, billboards, etc are a problem for me.

7b9b5de13a30c823dae64a971cb14add

(540)

on April 02, 2014
at 04:06 AM

my understanding that the shade/color of the light matters, so this would make sense. the blue light emitted by electronics/tv etc is supposedly more stimulating to the brain than yellow, amber etc.

0
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41767)

on April 01, 2014
at 12:05 AM

We did not evolve sleeping in darkness, so why would we need to now?

7904c7276d7e48f1be887fabd263bfd9

(300)

on April 01, 2014
at 12:18 AM

Everyone knows CAVEMEN slept in caves. They're not called PLANESMEN or TREESMEN, of course they evolved sleeping in the dark. :)

On a more serious note, it's not even what we 'evolved doing' it's really about what's ideal.

0
7904c7276d7e48f1be887fabd263bfd9

(300)

on March 31, 2014
at 11:24 PM

I guess you would need to define necessary.

If you mean required to sleep, then no, plenty of people can sleep in a fully lit room. Sadly your bodys melatonin production is negatively effected by light, so it could and probably does negatively impact sleep depending on the level of light. Obviously 1 led from a power strip is different from the hallway light being on with the door open and a street light shining through your open window. The situation is a really no-lose situation, you can only benefit.

Also why would the light from the moon or any light for that matter benefit sleep or 'not be bad'?

1c0aedabf44b6ac40db8cf880b762c7a

(0)

on April 01, 2014
at 12:22 PM

Is there any good evidence that low light significantly impacts melatonin? especially if your eyes are closed?

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