8

votes

How do you blackout your windows to sleep better?

Commented on February 05, 2015
Created September 08, 2010 at 4:41 AM

Robb Wolf suggested aluminum foil. Is that actually easy to put over a window? Does anyone have any less hideous solutions?

1c67bc28f4e44bbb8770b86df0463df3

(6719)

on July 09, 2012
at 03:53 PM

w 5% window tint

A31b063c5866c08aa9968a8f2f1e9949

(1721)

on August 08, 2011
at 11:27 PM

I have these in our bedrooms. About 95% black. Well worth the money.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on July 06, 2011
at 08:33 PM

holy smokes, thnks for posting that! I think imma order these. I've wondered for so long how people go about doing that.

Medium avatar

(3254)

on November 27, 2010
at 06:14 PM

Sounds cool. Is there any way you can post a link to a picture?

47a42b6be94caf700fce9509e38bb6a4

(9647)

on September 16, 2010
at 08:21 PM

Right, what ever happened to the health benefits of not sleeping in a stuffy room? ... You could sleep with the bedroom door open.

3b3acf9db158d0529702d09bf71afb4f

(20)

on September 16, 2010
at 07:46 PM

Not sure, but my room is pretty small and when everything is closed during the night I can definitely feel/smell it the next morning.

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on September 16, 2010
at 02:41 PM

What's the average consumption of air per square while sleeping ? I have my window open during the day so I don't really think about that.

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on September 16, 2010
at 09:41 AM

Someone has been looking at my window, blawwwww. I did that for quite a while but now I'm playing with the idea of magnet tracks on every side of the curtains, making it lightproof.

Fe783e04644862c30823614f31b9a996

(499)

on September 09, 2010
at 02:29 AM

then you've got to get a sun alarm, right? it gets complicated...

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78417)

on September 08, 2010
at 06:06 AM

BTW I am very light sensitive myself and always do my best to sleep in a pitch black room. If light hits my eyes in the night I wake up, so I understand your problem.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78417)

on September 08, 2010
at 06:04 AM

OK @Melissa -that is another matter. Drapes with black-out lining would be the best idea I think. Wouldn't it be a royal pain to put up and take down foil or whatever every night/day? Or maybe make some pj's out of black-out material instead! ;-)

5841391284e7af8c495c54bd90d3a795

(2764)

on September 08, 2010
at 05:53 AM

I live in the suburbs so the light is not too bright at night (though it's *definitely* not as dark as in rural parts of the country). I use the morning light to get me up without an alarm clock.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on September 08, 2010
at 05:41 AM

Robb Wolf said that your skin also takes in light. Also I tend to pull mine off during the night.

C0fcb48d7da4f76fac17318efd2cd6b8

(4069)

on September 08, 2010
at 05:39 AM

I was wondering the same thing.

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23 Answers

10
A89f9751a97c3082802dc0bcbe4e9208

(13978)

on September 08, 2010
at 07:09 AM

Duvatyne AKA Commando Cloth AKA Blackout Curtain.

Film industry people use this to blackout windows to be able to shoot night interiors during the day (among other uses). It works!

Make sure you get the really thick kind.

4
6ce321902473b18d1484e63a79e2c7db

on July 06, 2011
at 07:48 PM

I work nights so sleeping during the day is hard. I am planning on ordering these because they have gotten excellent reviews:

Blackout EZ

It is super simple and honestly, the most cost effective choice.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on July 06, 2011
at 08:33 PM

holy smokes, thnks for posting that! I think imma order these. I've wondered for so long how people go about doing that.

A31b063c5866c08aa9968a8f2f1e9949

(1721)

on August 08, 2011
at 11:27 PM

I have these in our bedrooms. About 95% black. Well worth the money.

3
47a42b6be94caf700fce9509e38bb6a4

(9647)

on September 16, 2010
at 04:44 AM

Just thought of something, a quick fix you can do in the meantime. If you have a large enough piece of cardboard (say, if one of your friends has just gotten some Ikea bookshelves) then you can cut it to fit your window just right so that the sides of the window make for slight compression in the cardboard, enough to keep it in place in the window. Then you also have something that is very easy to take down during the day and throw under your bed or wherever. I did this once when I was frequently sleeping in the middle of the day -- very un-paleo, I know. The trick is getting a big enough piece of cardboard.

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on September 16, 2010
at 09:41 AM

Someone has been looking at my window, blawwwww. I did that for quite a while but now I'm playing with the idea of magnet tracks on every side of the curtains, making it lightproof.

3
03b67d2b8e9e878147cb3f225c864207

(766)

on September 08, 2010
at 06:03 AM

Yeah the eye mask does not = black out room as your skin is still absorbing it.

What I did is got a $1.00 long piece of PVC pipe from home depot, got some fabric ring clips, and folded 2 old sheets into a curtain. For under $20 I have probably a 90% blackout going (I'm still tweaking it) but it looks good and I can pull open the curtains during the day.

Medium avatar

(3254)

on November 27, 2010
at 06:14 PM

Sounds cool. Is there any way you can post a link to a picture?

2
675291c313a66c7411267ea14a50b6ff

on December 07, 2012
at 11:33 PM

The ShiftShade blackout window shade is the best window covering I've found, and it doesn't require any attachments, glue, or velcro.

ShiftShade Blackout Window Shade

9fd3995d37155a42dd69de0057de06e7

(-2)

on February 05, 2015
at 09:36 PM

I tried ShiftShade and just got sick. I have chemical sensitivities. You have to cut the fiberglass rods to the right length. Doesn't mention anything about wearing a mask. My lungs are killing me. Avoid, especially for chemical sensitive individuals.

2
3b3acf9db158d0529702d09bf71afb4f

(20)

on September 16, 2010
at 11:03 AM

How do you get fresh air without an open window? I hate slowly using up the oxygen at night in a sealed room...

3b3acf9db158d0529702d09bf71afb4f

(20)

on September 16, 2010
at 07:46 PM

Not sure, but my room is pretty small and when everything is closed during the night I can definitely feel/smell it the next morning.

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on September 16, 2010
at 02:41 PM

What's the average consumption of air per square while sleeping ? I have my window open during the day so I don't really think about that.

47a42b6be94caf700fce9509e38bb6a4

(9647)

on September 16, 2010
at 08:21 PM

Right, what ever happened to the health benefits of not sleeping in a stuffy room? ... You could sleep with the bedroom door open.

1
6b923cf24b0227c095225dbc846b0741

on February 07, 2013
at 02:00 AM

Motherf!@#er that blackout ez window covers is just what I made for myself using the large rolls of black drawer mats. You know the rubber drawer mats you get from hardware stores to cut to fit inside your kitchen drawers. I cut them to size to fit on the outside of the window frame adhered to velcro strips. The only difference with his is his fabric is lighter, but I tested mine using a 1200 lumens flashlight and nothing gets through. Also because I cover it on the outside it is one large piece and it is heavy; ie it starts to pull on the top. I think I'll cut mine to fit like this guy's and just cover the glass panel. I also used white duct tape on the outside side so it doesn't look ugly from the street.

1
F7cf9588bc47db8b3b7ddeb5172a9311

(455)

on July 09, 2012
at 09:13 AM

How to make your own blackout blinds from the blog Eat Sleep Move: http://eatsleepmove.com.au/how-to-make-your-own-blackout-blinds/

1
1e460073685508336bcc44ae78063922

on July 09, 2012
at 07:04 AM

I work 3rd shift, and sleep during the day, and the light coming in really bothered me. I stopped at the hardware/lumber store and bought "1/2-inch foil-sheathed foam", and cut it to JUST fit inside my window, and lightly tapped it into place. It blocks out all the light, and cuts out the drafts too. Bonus is that it keeps the cats and dog off my bed, since there's no view of the outside for them!

1
Medium avatar

(19469)

on July 06, 2011
at 09:01 PM

Our apartment complex has those lantern style floodlights and one was positioned such that it was always "sunny" in our bedroom. Actually, we were both quite sad since neither of us could sleep and the blinds plus "blackout" curtains didn't come close to addressing the problem.

Frustrated and needing a low-cost solution, did some shopping around and eventually found sheets of foam insulation (~ 1 inch thick with a foil coating on one side) at Lowe's and cut them to the size of our bedroom windows. I inserted them between the blinds and the window itself (with the white side facing out and it made a tremendous difference.

Its not a perfect solution (we leave them in all the time, so the windows stay closed), but for less than $20 it has done the trick.

1
1c4ada15ca0635582c77dbd9b1317dbf

(2604)

on September 08, 2010
at 06:53 AM

I have blackout material lined curtains in my bedroom. Also extremely useful to have blackout blinds in young childrens rooms, especially in the summer when the light can otherwise wake them early. Doesn't feel very paleo...as it is artificially changing your light settings, but does allow you to sleep longer if that's your goal.

In the past, I also used black bin liners taped to my son's windows. Also looks tacky, but you could feasibly take these up and down pretty easily.

0
6e3b9ccb36504100d06c268e97cbe4ed

on November 14, 2014
at 09:45 PM

Make your own ShiftShade. Watch this on how it works: go to youtube DOT com and search for ShiftShade.

Then buy the fabric yourself. It's called: Roc-Lon Blackout Fabric and you can probably find it at your local fabric store (mine has a 40%off sale, AND a 25% off coupon you can find on their website: JoAnn DOT com )

Then decide how you want to put it in your window. If you want to do it like ShiftShade, buy the fiberglass rods on Amazon (remember to buy the end caps, too).

Alternatively, you can use neodymium magnets and metal thumb tacks, screws, or mount an additional magnet to your window frame.

This whole project will probably cost around $10 per window.

0
C53665c3f012fa1ede91033b08a8a6e7

(2269)

on September 07, 2013
at 12:44 AM

My flat has enormous windows, 110" x 50" and it also faces east so I get the rising sun blasting in far too early. Blackout curtains or blinds for that size would need to be custom-made and would run like $400. Last year I went to an art supply place and bought some giant sheets of 1/2" black Foam-Core board and some adhesive velcro. It worked for almost a year but the board started to warp and curl after awhile so I pulled it down. I have some more but I think I'll look into the blackout material and just staple-gun it to the window frame. There's no way to hang it like a curtain and still seal off the light as far as I know.

0
Ed7403e397077dd1acdbf25c7f6e56ce

on December 07, 2012
at 11:39 PM

A Hopi proverb speaks of two elders, contemplating their sore feet. The first laments it would be nice if the Earth was covered in soft furs... The second invents shoes.

Buy yourself a sleep mask.

0
7cf9f5b08a41ecf2a2d2bc0b31ea6fa0

on July 09, 2012
at 03:43 PM

I just sleep with a soft t shirt over my head

0
C0237fd9e277fcef496d538beda1f35b

(287)

on July 09, 2012
at 03:33 PM

We bought some liners to put up on our daughter's windows over the blinds. Come in a pair. They just slide onto a rod (we bought some of those inexpensive ones that have a hook on each side of the window and you line it up with the holes on the rod. Hold the weight pretty good). Maybe out $25-$30 each window. A must during the summer to keep them sleeping in a bit :) plus when school starts back up and they're going to bed when it's still light out.

0
Cca2744b26a21709a82330c909b5282a

on July 09, 2012
at 10:02 AM

I hung two black towels on curtain clips to the window side of my curtains, so that they could slide with the curtains as I opened and closed them and were hidden behind the curtain from the inside so they didn't look ugly, and it worked perfectly. That was until I realised I could sleep better without blackouts :P

0
4c8a9bec5a27b66b28d3c5cddeb70e93

on May 02, 2012
at 05:20 AM

Black corrugated plastic. Cheap, easy to cut to any window size. Works awesome. Durable. Lasts forever.

For extra darkness, line the edges with black duct tape.

0
9e975c86f483555ed19e59c5628488ca

(823)

on March 17, 2012
at 04:02 PM

We had a sheet metal shop cut us pieces of sheet metal exactly the size of the glass which were white one one side (so they look like closed blinds outside the house) the total cost was and then we taped them to the frame with aluminum foil tape. The total cost was less than $60 and light blockage was 100% except that we found a gap in the window frame! Not the solution's problem though, just bad workmanship in the windows. We could still slide the windows open for air when needed.

0
7431586c21bca496c5a7ec7bd0ca4d6e

(974)

on September 08, 2010
at 10:58 PM

I bought black out curtains at KMart.

0
7bea72ef073e8f76b5828727f1460900

(2713)

on September 08, 2010
at 06:02 AM

Aluminum foil is great as long as your complex/building/association doesn't prohibit it. It does look a bit "tacky" from the outside if that is a concern.

I ended up installing an extra layer of special "room darkening" shades over our blinds. It was basically a thin sheet of white opaque vinyl. If I recall correctly, it cost us around $50 to cover an 8' by 6' window.

-1
8cd927903628e0f3e0cb0b683e472e5d

on July 10, 2013
at 04:07 AM

Can anyone recommend a TEMPORARY way to black your room out? I like having natural light in my bedroom during the day, so it would be great to find a way to easily black it out at night (with minimal time required) to get better sleep, but also to be able to have that natural light during the day.

-1
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78417)

on September 08, 2010
at 05:29 AM

Why not just wear an eye mask like I do- it is a lot more cost effective to cover two eyes than a few windows, and it works really well.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on September 08, 2010
at 05:41 AM

Robb Wolf said that your skin also takes in light. Also I tend to pull mine off during the night.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78417)

on September 08, 2010
at 06:06 AM

BTW I am very light sensitive myself and always do my best to sleep in a pitch black room. If light hits my eyes in the night I wake up, so I understand your problem.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78417)

on September 08, 2010
at 06:04 AM

OK @Melissa -that is another matter. Drapes with black-out lining would be the best idea I think. Wouldn't it be a royal pain to put up and take down foil or whatever every night/day? Or maybe make some pj's out of black-out material instead! ;-)

C0fcb48d7da4f76fac17318efd2cd6b8

(4069)

on September 08, 2010
at 05:39 AM

I was wondering the same thing.

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