2

votes

Is Eating raw sweet potato bad for you?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created October 15, 2012 at 8:13 AM

I regularly eat raw sweet potato on the car ride home after karate. I view it the same as eating raw carrot. Are there any potential issues with eating raw sweet potato?

20999811fa9e70098a6e1b86f9b667dc

on July 29, 2014
at 04:55 AM

Actually eating sweet potatoes raw is very healthy for you. They are loaded with magnesium, caritonoids, vitamin B6, iron, vitamin D, vitamin C, potassium and natural fructose. The starch is minute, I have a degree in Medical Science Nutrition and this is why people in my profession recommend them as an alternative to potatoes.

Eating sweet potatoes raw will keep these constituents whole without harming them with over cooking etc. It is a great idea to eat them with hummus or low fat cream cheese.

If you have issues with your GI Tract I can guarantee it is from other harmful dietary habits!

D8612a7c536e74f9855b70d8e97919b5

(1042)

on April 06, 2014
at 11:17 PM

As noted in the recipe linked below, in a certain temperature range, an enzyme converts the starch in the sweet potatoes into sugar (maltose). This happens to a degree no matter which cooking method you use:

http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2010/11/the-best-roasted-sweet-potatoes-thanksgiving-sides-the-food-lab-recipe.html

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on August 16, 2013
at 07:56 PM

Did you not read my answer? Raw isn't always better..."the activity of the trypsin inhibitor present is destroyed by heat". I'm pretty sure that juice will still be chock full of trypsin inhibitors.

7c09a44d334ef8a8c7c2644b0b7e1383

(279)

on June 06, 2013
at 03:15 AM

And by each side I mean just two sides. So 10ish minutes total.

7c09a44d334ef8a8c7c2644b0b7e1383

(279)

on June 06, 2013
at 03:14 AM

Poke holes in the skin with a fork and microwave on each side for ~5 minutes. Works like a charm!

72cf727474b8bf815fdc505e58cadfea

on March 31, 2013
at 12:57 AM

sweet potato and yam are completely different plants.

1f71c5876cc990c754051d1f54486532

(0)

on March 30, 2013
at 06:44 PM

So according to the link, Sweet potato is apparently problematic yet Yam is not?!? It seems a little convoluted to me.

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on October 15, 2012
at 06:55 PM

You'll definitely hit that temperature mark in the microwave. I nuke 'em all the time, and they actually keep quite well for later in the day if put in a non-squishable container (you'll want more than foil, trust me, I've cleaned an embarrassing amount of sweet potato out of backpacks). You can also sort of inject a few generous pats of butter in there if you wait for it to cool a bit, and then slice the side open just enough to put the butter in and squish it shut again. Then when you are ready to eat, just peel the skin away like it is the foil on a burrito.

0ea747d651c21d4028eafd3e12e302f5

on October 15, 2012
at 11:57 AM

Thanks for the clarification BonebrothFast!

0ea747d651c21d4028eafd3e12e302f5

on October 15, 2012
at 11:56 AM

Awesome thank you Happy Now! I'll be sure to cook these guys up beforehand in future. On the cooking side, is it fair to just nuke it in the microwave if I am in a hurry. I would love to be able to cook in grass fed butter like the Caveman Doctor recommends but don't always have the time. I originally picked this up listening to Robb Wolf on the Paleo Solution Podcast say that he brings sweet potato to BJJ but he wasn't clear whether it was cooked or not. I am trying not to make too many assumption about the information I am getting, I am very glad you guys have clarified this for me. Cheers!

0ea747d651c21d4028eafd3e12e302f5

on October 15, 2012
at 11:54 AM

I haven't noticed any issues with digestion afterwards but then again I am trying to sort out issues with magnesium absorption aswell so I sort of have a few variables up in the air.

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on October 15, 2012
at 08:34 AM

I'm not sure how bad it would be for you, but to break down the starch and actually be able to derive most of the nutrients from it cooking is important. How's your digestion after eating raw sweet potato, seems like a recipe for a stomach ache and bloating to me?

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9 Answers

best answer

7
6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on October 15, 2012
at 08:59 AM

Found this little gem with a bit of googling (scroll down a ways until you get to sweet potatoes) http://www.fao.org/docrep/T0207E/T0207E08.htm

"There is a significant correlation between the trypsin inhibitor content and the protein content of the sweet potato variety. Heating to 90??C for several minutes inactivates trypsin inhibitors. Lawrence and Walker (1976) have implicated TIA in sweet potato as a contributory factor in the disease enteritis necroticans. This seems doubtful since sweet potato is not usually eaten raw and the activity of the trypsin inhibitor present is destroyed by heat."

There is also a blurb about the fartiness of raffinose in sweet potatoes, but I'd be more concerned about enteritis necroticans, a potentially fatal form of food poisoning that causes gangrene of the gut.

Long story short, cook those puppies before eating them!

0ea747d651c21d4028eafd3e12e302f5

on October 15, 2012
at 11:56 AM

Awesome thank you Happy Now! I'll be sure to cook these guys up beforehand in future. On the cooking side, is it fair to just nuke it in the microwave if I am in a hurry. I would love to be able to cook in grass fed butter like the Caveman Doctor recommends but don't always have the time. I originally picked this up listening to Robb Wolf on the Paleo Solution Podcast say that he brings sweet potato to BJJ but he wasn't clear whether it was cooked or not. I am trying not to make too many assumption about the information I am getting, I am very glad you guys have clarified this for me. Cheers!

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on October 15, 2012
at 06:55 PM

You'll definitely hit that temperature mark in the microwave. I nuke 'em all the time, and they actually keep quite well for later in the day if put in a non-squishable container (you'll want more than foil, trust me, I've cleaned an embarrassing amount of sweet potato out of backpacks). You can also sort of inject a few generous pats of butter in there if you wait for it to cool a bit, and then slice the side open just enough to put the butter in and squish it shut again. Then when you are ready to eat, just peel the skin away like it is the foil on a burrito.

7c09a44d334ef8a8c7c2644b0b7e1383

(279)

on June 06, 2013
at 03:15 AM

And by each side I mean just two sides. So 10ish minutes total.

7c09a44d334ef8a8c7c2644b0b7e1383

(279)

on June 06, 2013
at 03:14 AM

Poke holes in the skin with a fork and microwave on each side for ~5 minutes. Works like a charm!

3
0a9ad4e577fe24a6b8aafa1dd7a50c79

on October 15, 2012
at 08:48 AM

This seems like a really good way to give yourself serious potentially long-lasting GI issues.

No, eating a raw carrot is not the same as eating a raw sweet potato. Carrots have very little starch. A potato is essentially a starch bomb.

0ea747d651c21d4028eafd3e12e302f5

on October 15, 2012
at 11:57 AM

Thanks for the clarification BonebrothFast!

20999811fa9e70098a6e1b86f9b667dc

on July 29, 2014
at 04:55 AM

Actually eating sweet potatoes raw is very healthy for you. They are loaded with magnesium, caritonoids, vitamin B6, iron, vitamin D, vitamin C, potassium and natural fructose. The starch is minute, I have a degree in Medical Science Nutrition and this is why people in my profession recommend them as an alternative to potatoes.

Eating sweet potatoes raw will keep these constituents whole without harming them with over cooking etc. It is a great idea to eat them with hummus or low fat cream cheese.

If you have issues with your GI Tract I can guarantee it is from other harmful dietary habits!

0
Medium avatar

on July 29, 2014
at 11:45 AM

Its like sweet corn, pretty tasty but it has a lot of calories, so it will definitely increase your weight.

0
65c13b50f95327b630034042a96ff9f5

on April 06, 2014
at 10:01 PM

I don't see how a monosaccharide (fructose) can fluctuate on the glycemic scale by cooking the sweet potato. does the heat alter the sugar compound? doesn't cooking it just aid in digestion by weakening the cellulose in the cell wall? enlighten me please.

D8612a7c536e74f9855b70d8e97919b5

(1042)

on April 06, 2014
at 11:17 PM

As noted in the recipe linked below, in a certain temperature range, an enzyme converts the starch in the sweet potatoes into sugar (maltose). This happens to a degree no matter which cooking method you use:

http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2010/11/the-best-roasted-sweet-potatoes-thanksgiving-sides-the-food-lab-recipe.html

0
00b50bc699cacbbdda5ce934bdac3104

on August 16, 2013
at 07:36 PM

juice them, allow the starch to settle on the bottom on top of the starch you will have a delicious orange juice that is full of nutrients that your body will not have to work to absorb. Cooking sweet potatoes like most veggies reduces nutrients.

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on August 16, 2013
at 07:56 PM

Did you not read my answer? Raw isn't always better..."the activity of the trypsin inhibitor present is destroyed by heat". I'm pretty sure that juice will still be chock full of trypsin inhibitors.

0
764418ae2b761eb1aed5cec8a137ae6f

on June 20, 2013
at 03:25 AM

My triglycerides rose because I was eating lots of baked sweet potatoes, which rank very high on the glycemic index.

If you boil sweat potatoes till they get gelatinous, they are low on the glycemmic index. When they are gelatinous the carbs are absorbed more slowly. Sort of like the difference between brown rice and rice cakes.

0
Medium avatar

(389)

on June 06, 2013
at 04:06 PM

I wonder how this questions plays into our evolution / past ancestors. I am sure if they came across these things in the ground, they would eat them raw like most other things they found foraging.

Thoughts?

0
9053b882bcfa39aa5a1b8d31abd95d7c

(0)

on June 06, 2013
at 03:12 AM

I eat raw yams all the time. Love them and have no problems with my GI.

0
1f71c5876cc990c754051d1f54486532

on March 30, 2013
at 06:42 PM

With regard to the question of mature edible Yam's being toxic...

As the previous contributor posted the following link..

http://www.fao.org/docrep/T0207E/T0207E08.htm

I'm wondering if the last paragraph of that link clears up the question regarding Yam?

"Yam..

"The edible, mature, cultivated yam does not contain any toxic principles..."

1f71c5876cc990c754051d1f54486532

(0)

on March 30, 2013
at 06:44 PM

So according to the link, Sweet potato is apparently problematic yet Yam is not?!? It seems a little convoluted to me.

72cf727474b8bf815fdc505e58cadfea

on March 31, 2013
at 12:57 AM

sweet potato and yam are completely different plants.

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