2

votes

Goat's milk vs Cow's milk - Which is more beneficial for a toddler? Hack my little dude's intake :)

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 17, 2011 at 8:56 PM

I'm constantly trying to work on my little guys diet. He currently drinks more than the 'recommended' daily intake of cows milk for his age (however he's a big guy in the 99th percentile for both height and weight). I am wondering how goats milk might affect this. Or if switching to goat's milk altogether would get his intake down.

FYI - Children's recommended intake of dairy is 2 cups per day My guy drinks approximately 750ml which is 3 cups He's 32lbs and 20 months old He eats like a horse too.

SO please hack my little guys milk intake!

new info RDI for milk from canada food guide is for adequate Vitamin D

6714718e2245e5190017d643a7614157

on February 25, 2012
at 03:53 AM

Bree, did you ever try giving the goat milk to your son? I consider myself lucky to access to raw goat milk (even though I have to drive 30 miles to get it). I am trying to improve my dental health and bone density with the goat milk.

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on March 18, 2011
at 10:57 AM

After reading some stuff on Dr. Ayer's blog I totally agree with the first sentence "Infants would have been breastfed until they typically weaned themselves.

Cab7e4ef73c5d7d7a77e1c3d7f5773a1

(7314)

on March 17, 2011
at 10:36 PM

That seems pretty good then. I'd continue with the milk because it's providing him with some nutrients and healthy fat and is convenient and familiar to him as well. If he's eating paleo otherwise, I think it can fit right in.

Medium avatar

(12379)

on March 17, 2011
at 10:21 PM

I've visited the farm that our milk comes from, and the dairy cows are pastured. We visited a couple of months ago, and I did not know yet to ask whether they supplement or grain feed, I thought seeing them pastured was good enough evidence, so I'm not sure if they are wholly grass-fed

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18686)

on March 17, 2011
at 10:16 PM

That's great! Sounds like a good experience.

Cab7e4ef73c5d7d7a77e1c3d7f5773a1

(7314)

on March 17, 2011
at 10:12 PM

Is it grassfed at least? I think grassfed is actually more important. I would not give conventional milk, but grassfed and pasteurized would probably be fine.

2507b557331c8a674bc81197531e609a

(4994)

on March 17, 2011
at 10:11 PM

Ah nice! That's sounds lovely, what great awareness you are already instilling in your little man of where his food comes from! :D

2507b557331c8a674bc81197531e609a

(4994)

on March 17, 2011
at 10:10 PM

Wow, that's some fluctuation! :D I think you're right about the cultural thing, I could have happily have carried on but for lots of reasons we weaned at 2.

Medium avatar

(12379)

on March 17, 2011
at 09:54 PM

My guy weaned himself at 10.5 months (around the time he went to daycare) I wonder if this weaning was more cultural than his 'own' choice. I kept offering for a while, but he wasn't interested. I have to honestly say though I was relieved - engorgement was not friendly to me (i fluctuated daily from a DDD to an H). Did or are you still bf'ing?

Medium avatar

(12379)

on March 17, 2011
at 09:53 PM

I do believe goats are pastured, but so are the dairy cows from the dairy that we buy from. We actually took my little guy for a farm tour - great thing to do with kids!

Medium avatar

(12379)

on March 17, 2011
at 09:51 PM

My guy weaned himself at 10.5 months (around the time he went to daycare) I wonder if this weaning was more cultural than his 'own' choice. I kept offering for a while, but he wasn't interested. I have to honestly say though I was relieved - engorgement was not friendly to me (i daily flucuated from a DDD to an H)

Medium avatar

(12379)

on March 17, 2011
at 09:47 PM

Raw milk is not legal for sale in canada. We buy the closest to local that we can find.

77732bf6bf2b8a360f523ef87c3b7523

(6157)

on March 17, 2011
at 09:31 PM

Is any of this grass-fed and/or raw?

50637dfd7dc7a7e811d82283f4f5fd10

(5838)

on March 17, 2011
at 09:12 PM

Cheers to you, raising a lil paleo baby. I can wait for kids (till Im ready), but Im anxiously waiting to bring a kid or two up with proper nutrition

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6 Answers

3
2507b557331c8a674bc81197531e609a

(4994)

on March 17, 2011
at 09:49 PM

Infants would have been breastfed until they typically weaned themselves, which would probably have been around the age of 4 (possibly older) so dairy is probably good to go as long as it's raw, grass fed, or failing that at least organic and absolutely definitely FULL FAT :D My little 3 years old girl loves full fat milk, and heavy cream, and butter actually, she's a proper little Paleo lady :D

2507b557331c8a674bc81197531e609a

(4994)

on March 17, 2011
at 10:10 PM

Wow, that's some fluctuation! :D I think you're right about the cultural thing, I could have happily have carried on but for lots of reasons we weaned at 2.

Medium avatar

(12379)

on March 17, 2011
at 09:54 PM

My guy weaned himself at 10.5 months (around the time he went to daycare) I wonder if this weaning was more cultural than his 'own' choice. I kept offering for a while, but he wasn't interested. I have to honestly say though I was relieved - engorgement was not friendly to me (i fluctuated daily from a DDD to an H). Did or are you still bf'ing?

Medium avatar

(12379)

on March 17, 2011
at 09:51 PM

My guy weaned himself at 10.5 months (around the time he went to daycare) I wonder if this weaning was more cultural than his 'own' choice. I kept offering for a while, but he wasn't interested. I have to honestly say though I was relieved - engorgement was not friendly to me (i daily flucuated from a DDD to an H)

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on March 18, 2011
at 10:57 AM

After reading some stuff on Dr. Ayer's blog I totally agree with the first sentence "Infants would have been breastfed until they typically weaned themselves.

1
D0578c3826123f66a80b034cd3e78816

(565)

on March 18, 2011
at 04:07 AM

Goat and sheep milk is less allergenic than cow milk is. They are also naturally "homogenized." That's the only difference I know of but within cow milk there are huge differences too depending on whether it's been pasteurized and whether it's A1 (most store milk, Holstein) or A2 (Jersey, Guernsey).

1
E8022f05c250e19a65b92207dd1630ca

on March 17, 2011
at 10:58 PM

According to the what the literature says goats milk has been found to be less problematic in terms of any allergic response in the human body. The goat proteins are assimilated better by our gut compared to bovine proteins since goats are not ruminant animals like cows who have 4 stomachs. Children's guts are naturally leaky in early phases of life so that they can absorb and digest proteins and immune globulins from their mother's milk, and eventually the gap junctions of the gut fuse within the first year or 2 of life. Cow's milk can be problematic since the larger proteins can pass through a leaky gut and the body can produce an autoimmune response. This can lead to atopic diseases (asthma, allergies, eczema etc) and an overall lowered immunity and inflammation. Goat proteins are less problematic and are less likely to cause immune reactions. To reduce your little guy's risk of leaky gut issues it is important to minimize grain and legumes. Other gut-inflammatory items can be medications including antibiotics, processed foods, and homogenized dairy. Overall if you choose to give your child dairy, goat is a good go-to, then raw cow milk, but a good idea to minimize homogenized cow's milk for gut and immune health. One more thing, the USDA tells the public that milk is necessary for your child but this is totally false. There are only monetary motivations behind this recommendation and none in terms of optimal health and function. Children (or adults) are not really designed to ingest daily amounts of cow milk. Cow milk is perfectly designed for baby cows, but not so much for a developing human. Hope this helps!

1
74f5d2ff6567edd456d31dfb9b92af61

(5227)

on March 17, 2011
at 10:41 PM

One thing I would keep in mind is that goat's milk is naturally lower in fat than cow's milk. I'm sure you'd have no trouble making up his fats elsewhere if you decide to go that route, though.

Kudos to you for raising a paleo child! :)

1
100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18686)

on March 17, 2011
at 09:45 PM

I wonder what the RDA is based on? I would not be surprised if it is trying to limit saturated fat, in which case it is to be wholly ignored.

From what I understand, goat's milk is more digestible, and the composition is more like human milk, but I haven't verified this.

ETA: A quick search seems to indicate that goats milk has slightly less lactose, more short-chain fatty acids, and more highly digestible fats, and a different kind of casein that fewer people are allergic to.

Also, aren't goats usually pastured? I'm not sure about that.

Medium avatar

(12379)

on March 17, 2011
at 09:53 PM

I do believe goats are pastured, but so are the dairy cows from the dairy that we buy from. We actually took my little guy for a farm tour - great thing to do with kids!

2507b557331c8a674bc81197531e609a

(4994)

on March 17, 2011
at 10:11 PM

Ah nice! That's sounds lovely, what great awareness you are already instilling in your little man of where his food comes from! :D

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18686)

on March 17, 2011
at 10:16 PM

That's great! Sounds like a good experience.

0
B6a13fe7674cd7f3c0dc13a9839f8a71

on October 13, 2011
at 09:01 PM

My suggestion is do all you can to research and find out how to raise goats. Either get one or two or find a very reliable goat person, they are all over the USA who will give you fresh raw goat milk for free. No legal problem. You can simply offer to give something, a gift, to them for their generosity. Milking seasons come and go, so its always nice to get several sources. If you are out east this should be no problem!

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