2

votes

Most nutrient rich low carb fruits and vegetables?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created July 12, 2011 at 1:47 PM

What are the most nutrient rich veg and fruit in relation to carb count? I'm trying to stay at about 30 gms of carb/day after fiber is subtracted and finding it somewhat difficult. It seems like this must have been asked before, but I'm just not seeing it.

I have excellent access to all kinds of produce, so don't worry about suggesting odd things. I do like to eat mostly seasonal and local, but a lot is grown in this area. Also, in this extreme heat/humidity I eat mostly raw or things that can be cooked outside on the grill (or less so, in the crockpot).

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on July 12, 2011
at 06:26 PM

One has to remember to blach it in largest possible pot to dissolve as much oxalic acid as possible. Its very high in oxalic acids.

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on July 12, 2011
at 06:22 PM

Yes this is sort of national herb of finland. Even many young people collect it still. Its truly better than spinach.

776bb678d88f7194b0fa0e5146df14f0

(1069)

on July 12, 2011
at 05:03 PM

Great info, thanks!

Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on July 12, 2011
at 04:47 PM

Antioxidants - especially the skin, anti-inflammatories, b vitamins, omega-3 fats in the seeds, etc. All the benefits definitely apply to all summer squash. Try to eat your summer squash when they're on the small side as they're less bitter and much tastier eaten raw. If they get big you can use a peeler or mandoline to make "noodles" and make sure to leave the skin on :)

776bb678d88f7194b0fa0e5146df14f0

(1069)

on July 12, 2011
at 04:24 PM

What are the health benefits of Zucchini? Do they apply to other squash as well? I've just started growing some summer squash and they are exploding, so I'm happy to see they're not nutritionally bereft...

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on July 12, 2011
at 04:00 PM

These are all great, helpful answers. Thank you all.

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on July 12, 2011
at 02:50 PM

Herbs (smacks head) absolutely brilliant! I've even seen recipes for old (late middle ages - Renaissance) salads that relied heavily on herbs and wild greens.

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7 Answers

6
Fa9f340eddbad9a544184c688fa4dcdd

(6433)

on July 12, 2011
at 02:02 PM

I'm surprised no-one else has mentioned that low-carb powerhouse, spinach. Loads of potassium and magnesium (just what low-carbers need especially), vitamin C, beta-carotene, manganese, copper, selenium, iron e.t.c and also plenty of choline, betaine and the B vitamins necessary to neutralise the homocysteine engendered by a high methionine diet e.g. a meat rich diet. One of the very few omega 6 free foods with significant vitamin E.

6
0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on July 12, 2011
at 01:57 PM

Blueberries can't be beat. Other berries are great too, but the mighty blue is a powerhouse.

I honestly don't eat very many veggies - just not my thing. But what I've started doing is growing a variety of herbs like rosemary, thyme, oregano, mint and basil and having a mix of it (about a handful) with lunch. The nutrient content and phytonutrients of herbs are huge compared to lettuce and such. Oh, and they have so few calories I wouldn't bother counting them :).

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on July 12, 2011
at 02:50 PM

Herbs (smacks head) absolutely brilliant! I've even seen recipes for old (late middle ages - Renaissance) salads that relied heavily on herbs and wild greens.

4
33b6c516904a967ef8ecb30f1dbd8cf2

(7073)

on July 12, 2011
at 02:13 PM

If you are going for low carbs/high nutrients try nettles.

They are very high in calcium, magnesium and are high in iron, potassium, zinc, Vitamin B's and A; they supply niacin, protein, vitamin C, D and K. Nettle has 3 times more iron than spinach, 7 times more Vit C than oranges and have 35% protein on dried weight. Overall nettle is 3 times more nutrient dense than any cultivated green you can buy (and they are free).....

Here is a recipe for nettle pesto, or you can wilt the leaves over a flame to get rid of the sting and eat like spinach.

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on July 12, 2011
at 06:26 PM

One has to remember to blach it in largest possible pot to dissolve as much oxalic acid as possible. Its very high in oxalic acids.

44348571d9bc70c02ac2975cc500f154

(5853)

on July 12, 2011
at 06:22 PM

Yes this is sort of national herb of finland. Even many young people collect it still. Its truly better than spinach.

3
Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on July 12, 2011
at 02:37 PM

Blackberries, raspberries, strawberries, papaya (a bit higher in sugar) - these dudes are amazing for your bod. I want to support the furry Kiwi, too. Yes it's higher in natural sugar than some of the other fruits but the level of vitamins E - C - K, potassium, copper, the seeds carry an omega 3 fatty acid property, I'm only giving a few things, too!, make them an amazing occasional treat.

For veg I like heavy greens such as kale, spinach, turnip greens, dandelion, purslane, as I can eat them raw or cooked - the kale leaves are great to wrap around a burger as a "bun" to hold in your hands. Broccoli is another - broccoli kind of bugs me for some reason so I don't really buy it that often. Zucchini has fantastic health benefits, you're not going to eat a billion of them so the carb/sugar ratio isn't bad, and if you can get your hands on an avocado squash or a Zephyr zucchini - do it. So good, I make salads out of them, mandoline thinly, salt, some lemon juice, a bit of mint and prosciutto - tasty!, and add as the base to my frittatas. Happy eating!

776bb678d88f7194b0fa0e5146df14f0

(1069)

on July 12, 2011
at 05:03 PM

Great info, thanks!

776bb678d88f7194b0fa0e5146df14f0

(1069)

on July 12, 2011
at 04:24 PM

What are the health benefits of Zucchini? Do they apply to other squash as well? I've just started growing some summer squash and they are exploding, so I'm happy to see they're not nutritionally bereft...

Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on July 12, 2011
at 04:47 PM

Antioxidants - especially the skin, anti-inflammatories, b vitamins, omega-3 fats in the seeds, etc. All the benefits definitely apply to all summer squash. Try to eat your summer squash when they're on the small side as they're less bitter and much tastier eaten raw. If they get big you can use a peeler or mandoline to make "noodles" and make sure to leave the skin on :)

3
Aead76beb5fc7b762a6b4ddc234f6051

(15239)

on July 12, 2011
at 01:58 PM

Parsley! Kale! Chard!

2
8949bf87b0e0aefcad10f29975e4fa2b

(8989)

on July 12, 2011
at 10:14 PM

Purslane wins every time.

2
Medium avatar

(19479)

on July 12, 2011
at 05:56 PM

Herbs: basil, rosemary, oregano, thyme, etc.

Spices: cinnamon, tumeric, cayenne pepper, cocoa (I consider pure unsweetened, naturally processed and/or raw cocoa a spice) etc.

Greens: dandelion, chard, spinach, kale, mustard, collards, beet, etc.

Low GI/GL Fruits: lemon/lime (for dressing and flavoring water), unsweetened acai puree (for smoothies), blackberries, tamarind (check out this post for more info about this amazing fruit), etc.

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