2

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Hack Dr Mark Hyman's "The Blood Sugar Solution"

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 02, 2012 at 10:54 AM

Does anyone have a reaction to Dr Hyman's new book?

Dr Mark Hyman is popular dr with a lot of smart things to say about how health care is whacko. He's re-named T2 diabetes and obesity "Diabesity." His new book "The Blood Sugar Solution" is out, and it sounds like Paleo but he doesnt admit it!

Anyone else been watching this one? The book was just released. He claims to reverse "Diabesity" in 6 weeks (from his website). http://drhyman.com/

I've read Dr Hyman ragging on low carb before, but he writes a book like this!

F291857fa12a0291688ea994343156dc

(720)

on July 19, 2014
at 06:07 PM

I have read the book and I agree with @thhq the book is about hyping Hyman's 'solution' I read it in Fall of 2012... when I started my fat loss & diet changing process. Pollan, Taubes, Hyman, Ferriss, Sisson, Paleo all kinda inhabit similar / overlapping 'diet space"...

imo more similarities than differences, I see them as pretty much JERF advocates (or maybe it's just my takeaway) with a few personalized quirks or specialty hacks YMMV

F291857fa12a0291688ea994343156dc

(720)

on July 19, 2014
at 05:59 PM

We'll see but I'm thinking if you continue to avoid refined carbs ..... I think you'll do fine

imo, maintaining stable & decent level of body fat % can be a marker that indicates everything you're doing is working.

cheers

Medium avatar

(10557)

on July 19, 2014
at 01:13 PM

Here's how I fixed my Type II. This worked faster than Hyman's 6 week plan - blood sugar was controlled in 2 weeks and no more metformin for me.

https://www.novomedlink.com/diabetes-patient-suppo...

It's the big secret Hyman doesn't want you to know about.

Medium avatar

(10557)

on July 19, 2014
at 01:04 PM

Calling out a shyster isn't nitpicking satarin. This guy's not providing medical services anymore. He's retreading other people's work and appending is own unsupported holistic notions. That's dangerous.

Medium avatar

(10557)

on July 19, 2014
at 12:28 PM

2 years later there are 220 copies of this book on abebooks. Now is the time to buy! The holistic karma guy has moved on to new bookselling frontiers.

Medium avatar

(10557)

on July 19, 2014
at 12:16 PM

The world of science is backwards. Right buddy.

Medium avatar

(10557)

on July 19, 2014
at 12:03 PM

The difference? Coining a new word? Or recommending piles of supplements? Or flogging a book? Smells like an old retread.

Ab58508bbbb977aed2b33d0b0056bdd9

on July 18, 2014
at 09:54 PM

Dr. Hyman is all about selling books and making money not legitimate information

Ab58508bbbb977aed2b33d0b0056bdd9

on July 18, 2014
at 09:52 PM

I read Dr Hyman's book and have followed him. He just writes anything so he can "get paid". All Dr Hyman is about is marketing and making money. People can do their own research in the library and not waste money on his books.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19142)

on August 18, 2013
at 09:17 PM

Jeez doc, turn off the caps lock, it's like you're shouting.

D33a8d5f095a8532ddf7a0d6c27bfe63

(578)

on August 18, 2013
at 05:11 AM

This is a misleading review. Where does Hyman say that he's a scientist? You mean he's making claims regarding toxins and the environment which should have been made by a scientist? All the figures cited by Hyman are reasonable: 80% of Americans don't have sufficient Vit D: do you disagree with this? Taking him to task for not mentioning hypoglycemia is no worse sin than omitting the dangers of hypothyroidism when VLCing. This pettiness is comical, especially when Hyman graduated from higher-ranked med school, is more literate and has better reasoning skills than our so called reviewer.

D33a8d5f095a8532ddf7a0d6c27bfe63

(578)

on August 18, 2013
at 01:08 AM

Good point, Doc. But most medical doctors don't completely abandon their clinical roots and have an itch for wanting to diagnose everything. And the same goes for you, too. Not all drugs are bad but what's this strange fetish you have for Crestor?

D33a8d5f095a8532ddf7a0d6c27bfe63

(578)

on August 18, 2013
at 01:00 AM

What do you expect him to use, then? L.Ac., when he isn't one? The guy went to med skool and is board-certified but believes in holistic healing. He's not the only one. Why don't you give it a rest. You make yourself look bad by nit-picking.

Medium avatar

(10557)

on July 20, 2013
at 06:48 PM

I still think he's a shyster, by using the title Dr. when he's really a holistic practitioner. His former medical career has no connection with what he's doing now.

Medium avatar

(10557)

on July 20, 2013
at 06:37 PM

Thanks for the interesting info sataran. Holistic alternative karma goes way beyond paleo and med schools.

Medium avatar

(10557)

on July 20, 2013
at 06:19 PM

We? There's a malfunction somewhere in the auto-post program.

D33a8d5f095a8532ddf7a0d6c27bfe63

(578)

on July 20, 2013
at 01:35 AM

The guy is legit and he has stellar credentials. He just happens to be a maverick and chose the off the beaten path. Once he became medical director of Canyon Ranch and went knee-deep in holistic alternative karma, he had no choice but to turn his back on conventional medicine -- his view usually through the lens of a vegetarian but more recently he's embraced fish, eggs, lean meats a la Dr. Furhman. Another cheerleader for nutrient density. Paleo, no but somewhat. And gluten-free, yes.

Medium avatar

(10557)

on July 19, 2013
at 10:03 PM

And I left out half a dozen more of you post-poppers...

Medium avatar

(10557)

on July 19, 2013
at 10:01 PM

Katie, Patie, FitFrankie: these are names for pet dogs! LOL you can do better than this book-flogging bots! At least TRY to make us believe you're humans!

Medium avatar

(10557)

on July 19, 2013
at 09:57 PM

And not being able to name a real university could be shysterism, but maybe he's just careless and forgetful about something that trivial.

Medium avatar

(10557)

on July 19, 2013
at 09:54 PM

It's interesting seeing all the one-time posts supporting Hyman over the past year. I've seen this kind of bot-posting on other diet blogs. It has the desired effect of keeping the book on the top of the string where people can see it. From time to time I'll call out one of the bookselling bots to see if they respond. Only one ever did.

75d65450b6ff0be7b969fb321f1200ac

(2506)

on March 05, 2013
at 06:20 PM

Katie, the Paleo diet does NOT omit carbs altogether. Although there seems to be 50 shades of Paleo out there, even in its most strict form Paleo dieters do get carbs from fruit. The more permissive forms of Paleo, like what is suggested in the Perfect Health Diet, permits certain starchy veggies and suggests a 150 gram/day carb intake.

A402a961303d312055dc0b253f29deac

(320)

on February 16, 2013
at 04:55 PM

Diabesity? Seriously? With 40% of all type II diabetics having a normal BMI and many people in the overweight range not diabetic?

Medium avatar

(10557)

on September 05, 2012
at 10:24 PM

Everyone who is susceptible to it becomes more prone to getting it as they age. I reversed my Type II by losing weight at age 54, but I expect that it could return at my lower weight as I get older.

Medium avatar

(10557)

on September 05, 2012
at 10:19 PM

I used the booklet offered here, which I originally got from my dr. http://www2.massgeneral.org/bmg/diabetes/1500%20meal%20plan.pdf The methodology could be adapted to any diet, from vegan to SAD to paleo. It forces you away from eating easy-to-digest carbs by limiting them. Part of this is done by overall caloric restriction, and part is done by causing you to deplete your allowed exchanges with fairly small amounts of the undesirable carbs. The system was developed by the ADA 50-60 years ago, and is somewhat similar to weight watchers points, though the intent is to control blood sugar.

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on August 20, 2012
at 05:16 PM

@Steve Parker -- are you saying you *don't* think poor diets and chronic stress play a role in the pathogenesis of things like chronic fatigue, MS, IBS, and migraines? I'm not agreeing or disagreeing with anyone here, just saying that those are good examples of conditions that many folks see great improvements with when they radically alter their diets and lifestyles.

4112b6a8a428eaeb4aa3c6e0be6e61ac

(0)

on August 11, 2012
at 02:12 PM

@thhq - Can you provide a link or elaborate the carb exchange counting that helped you to get rid of your diabetes? Very much interested.

Medium avatar

(10557)

on April 07, 2012
at 10:21 PM

Ulsterman ask me a question about carb exchange counting and I'll tell you intelligently why it worked to get rid of my diabetes. I don't need to know about Hyman's method in detail but I like to stay aware of the current fads. Spend your money however you like but don't tell me how to spend mine.

0424267365461e2b4bbd8d083bf87ac2

(0)

on April 07, 2012
at 02:49 PM

What an arrogant fool, read the book - then award yourself the winner...

Ea7f88369a9b3df9ba181e7401456940

(0)

on March 30, 2012
at 11:14 PM

Functional medicine is not Dr. Hyman's creation. Check out the Institute of Functional Medicine (IFM) for more info. I am a physician and a patient of Dr. Hyman's's. I have used his recommendations to fix my headaches, fibromyalgia, hypothyroidism (antibodies are gone) and IBS. I went to a functional medicine conference and at lunch sat between two women, one cured of MS, one cured of Lupus through radically changing their diets. If I limit myself to what is well-proven, then I am at the mercy of the drug companies. common sense tells me to avoid chemicals. i don't need research for that.

Medium avatar

(10557)

on March 13, 2012
at 12:34 PM

So what I said is true then. It's mostly about diet. Why quibble? I don't buy the books, and am only interested in tracking the ideas. Compared to "the master cleanse" and "last chance" the NE is tame.

19fad2250daf78bd0379b1840ce03ef9

(60)

on March 12, 2012
at 03:05 PM

To me, Paleo isn't just a diet. It's a way of thinking. For example, why do we eat a pre-workout meal? Because we've been told that we need energy to perform our workout. But let's look at this in the context of being a hunter-gatherer. Hunting for food is like exercise. It's physically demanding. Now imagine telling the caveman that he needs to eat before going on his hunt. The whole reason he's going out to hunt is to get food. But now you're telling him to eat first. Well if he has food to eat, then why go out to hunt?

19fad2250daf78bd0379b1840ce03ef9

(60)

on March 12, 2012
at 02:54 PM

That's not true. The book talks about performing regular exercise. He recommends weight training as well as HIIT. But the bulk of the book focuses on diet. He does make clear, however, that this isn't temporary nor should the focus be on losing weight. He's more concerned with optimizing health. Weight loss happens as a side effect.

79b187d791eae49070a90d6ca7ee5547

(125)

on March 12, 2012
at 11:20 AM

You have a good point. I was arriving at a Paleo way of eating before I even knew what Paleo meant. It just feels right for me and is in line with traditional eating, which just makes sense to me. Nowadays many of us, because of technological advances (juicing machines, transportation, etc.) seem to think that we've got a sudden intellectual "leg up" on nutrition over our forbears. To me, it's pure arrogance to think that we all of a sudden know how to nourish ourselves better than our ancestors. We have yet a lot to learn from them.

19fad2250daf78bd0379b1840ce03ef9

(60)

on March 09, 2012
at 09:00 PM

First of all, he does show how things like hypothyroidism, migraines, and IBS can be traced back to toxins and allergens. Perhaps you should read his books and articles more carefully. Second, did you bother to understand why he's recommending supplements? Sure it sounds like he's selling them. But that doesn't invalidate the point he's making, which is that our food is lacking in important nutrients because of our poor soil. Lastly, you make it sound like Hyman invented Functional Medicine. He didn't. This is a relatively new specialty in the field of medicine. Don't judge it just on him only

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on March 02, 2012
at 06:58 PM

Thanks for taking the time to do the review!

Medium avatar

(10557)

on March 02, 2012
at 05:30 PM

I love goofy diets. I should start a collection of the books I can get at the goodwill for under a dollar.

Medium avatar

(10557)

on March 02, 2012
at 05:28 PM

Trademarked diabesity? Oh brother. I almost let the spell checker have its way with that word.

E0250b1e6dc5ec1539ffb745042b4d80

(3661)

on March 02, 2012
at 04:28 PM

I was with you (very good, thanks!) until the last part about "Functional Medicine." My understanding of his use of this term (and I've seen it here before too) is that he means treat the whole body, not just symptoms, find the root cause, do what makes you more healthy before something passes the gate and becomes a "disease" so you can get a drs attention! Sounds like he's right and "Medicine" is wrong to me. I know that medicine has its head way, way up its backside as far as this goes. Isn't Hyman's approach appropriate for type 2, and not type 1? Is there some confusion here?

B4e1fa6a8cf43d2b69d97a99dfca262c

(10265)

on March 02, 2012
at 02:32 PM

what a great speaker!

Medium avatar

(10557)

on March 02, 2012
at 02:22 PM

The website teasers mention ancestors but I don't see anything suggesting that we act like them. More like hook to sell books to paleos. The diet itself looks pretty much Med, except for a couple expensive game meats. Just another retread which co-opts egotistically to put bucks in the bank.

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19 Answers

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11
Cdee7454bccdc4ac14ec23b9657eb573

on March 02, 2012
at 04:19 PM

Here's my book review, which should ruffle a few feathers here!


The promotional blurbs by the likes of Dr. Oz, Dr. Dean Ornish, and Deepak Chopra predisposed me to dislike this book. But it's not as bad as I thought it'd be.

The good parts first. Dr. Hyman favors the Mediterranean diet, strength training, and high-intensity interval training. His recommended way of eating is an improvement over the standard American diet, improving prospects for health and longevity. His dietary approach to insulin-resistant overweight/obesity and type 2 diabetes includes 1) avoidance of sugar, flour, processed foods, 2) preparation of your own meals from natural, whole food, and 3) keeping glycemic loads low. All well and good for weight loss and blood sugar control. It's not a vegetarian diet.

The author proposes a new trade-marked medical condition: diabesity. It refers to insulin resistance in association with (usually)

overweight, obesity, and/or type 2 diabetes mellitus. Dr. Hyman says half of Americans have this brand-new disorder, and he has the cure. If you don't have overt diabetes or prediabetes, you'll have to get your insulin levels measured to see if you have diabesity.

He reiterates many current politically correct fads, such as grass-fed/pastured beef, organic food, detoxification, and strict avoidance of all man-made chemicals, notwithstanding the relative lack of scientific evidence supporting many of these positions.

Dr. Hyman bills himself as a scientist, but his biography in the book doesn't support that label. Shoot, I've got a B.S. degree in zoology, but I'm a practicing physician, not a scientist.

The author thinks there are only six causes of all disease: single-gene genetic disorders, poor diet, chonic stress, microbes, toxins, and allergens. None of those explain hypothyroidism, tinnitus, migraines, irritable bowel syndrome, Parkinsons disease, chronic fatigue syndrome, or multiple sclerosis, to name a few that don't fit his paradigm.

Dr. Hyman makes a number of claims that are just plain wrong. Here are some: - Over 80% of Americans are deficient in vitamin D - Lack of fiber contributes to cancer - High C-reactive protein (in blood) is linked to a 1,700% increased probability of developing diabetes - Processed, factory-made foods have no nutrients - We must take nutritional supplements

Furthermore, he recommends a minimum of 11 and perhaps as many as 16 different supplements even though the supportive science is weak or nonexistent. Is he selling supplements?

After easily finding these bloopers, I started questioning many other of the author's statements.

I was very troubled by the apparent lack of warning about hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Many folks with diabetes will be reading this book. They could experience hypoglycemia on this diet if they're taking certain diabetes drugs: insulin, sulfonylureas, meglitinides, pramlintide plus insulin, exenatide plus sulfonylurea, and possibly thiazolidinediones, to name a few instances.

If you don't have diabetes but do need to lose weight, this book may help. If you have diabetes, strongly consider an alternative such as Dr. Bernstein's Diabetes Solution.

In the interest of brevity, I'll not comment on Dr. Hyman's substitution of time-tested science-based medicine with his own "Functional Medicine."

E0250b1e6dc5ec1539ffb745042b4d80

(3661)

on March 02, 2012
at 04:28 PM

I was with you (very good, thanks!) until the last part about "Functional Medicine." My understanding of his use of this term (and I've seen it here before too) is that he means treat the whole body, not just symptoms, find the root cause, do what makes you more healthy before something passes the gate and becomes a "disease" so you can get a drs attention! Sounds like he's right and "Medicine" is wrong to me. I know that medicine has its head way, way up its backside as far as this goes. Isn't Hyman's approach appropriate for type 2, and not type 1? Is there some confusion here?

Medium avatar

(10557)

on March 02, 2012
at 05:28 PM

Trademarked diabesity? Oh brother. I almost let the spell checker have its way with that word.

Medium avatar

(10557)

on March 02, 2012
at 05:30 PM

I love goofy diets. I should start a collection of the books I can get at the goodwill for under a dollar.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on March 02, 2012
at 06:58 PM

Thanks for taking the time to do the review!

19fad2250daf78bd0379b1840ce03ef9

(60)

on March 09, 2012
at 09:00 PM

First of all, he does show how things like hypothyroidism, migraines, and IBS can be traced back to toxins and allergens. Perhaps you should read his books and articles more carefully. Second, did you bother to understand why he's recommending supplements? Sure it sounds like he's selling them. But that doesn't invalidate the point he's making, which is that our food is lacking in important nutrients because of our poor soil. Lastly, you make it sound like Hyman invented Functional Medicine. He didn't. This is a relatively new specialty in the field of medicine. Don't judge it just on him only

Ea7f88369a9b3df9ba181e7401456940

(0)

on March 30, 2012
at 11:14 PM

Functional medicine is not Dr. Hyman's creation. Check out the Institute of Functional Medicine (IFM) for more info. I am a physician and a patient of Dr. Hyman's's. I have used his recommendations to fix my headaches, fibromyalgia, hypothyroidism (antibodies are gone) and IBS. I went to a functional medicine conference and at lunch sat between two women, one cured of MS, one cured of Lupus through radically changing their diets. If I limit myself to what is well-proven, then I am at the mercy of the drug companies. common sense tells me to avoid chemicals. i don't need research for that.

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on August 20, 2012
at 05:16 PM

@Steve Parker -- are you saying you *don't* think poor diets and chronic stress play a role in the pathogenesis of things like chronic fatigue, MS, IBS, and migraines? I'm not agreeing or disagreeing with anyone here, just saying that those are good examples of conditions that many folks see great improvements with when they radically alter their diets and lifestyles.

D33a8d5f095a8532ddf7a0d6c27bfe63

(578)

on August 18, 2013
at 05:11 AM

This is a misleading review. Where does Hyman say that he's a scientist? You mean he's making claims regarding toxins and the environment which should have been made by a scientist? All the figures cited by Hyman are reasonable: 80% of Americans don't have sufficient Vit D: do you disagree with this? Taking him to task for not mentioning hypoglycemia is no worse sin than omitting the dangers of hypothyroidism when VLCing. This pettiness is comical, especially when Hyman graduated from higher-ranked med school, is more literate and has better reasoning skills than our so called reviewer.

4
19fad2250daf78bd0379b1840ce03ef9

on March 09, 2012
at 09:06 PM

I suspect that Hyman knows he's advocating a Paleo like approach. But perhaps he doesn't want to be classified under that heading. Let's face it. Once you've been branded as a Paleo person, people either agree with you or think you're a nut. What I've noticed though is that more and more people are essentially arriving at a Paleo like diet, even if they don't want to call it that. Besides Hyman, there's the author of Cure Tooth Decay who talks about using diet to prevent and even reverse tooth decay. If you read the book, you'll see a huge overlap between his diet and Paleo. So I think authors like Hyman actually help the Paleo movement. They send the message that this isn't just a bunch of nutcases on the fringe. Now we're seeing actual doctors come out of the Paleo closet.

19fad2250daf78bd0379b1840ce03ef9

(60)

on March 12, 2012
at 03:05 PM

To me, Paleo isn't just a diet. It's a way of thinking. For example, why do we eat a pre-workout meal? Because we've been told that we need energy to perform our workout. But let's look at this in the context of being a hunter-gatherer. Hunting for food is like exercise. It's physically demanding. Now imagine telling the caveman that he needs to eat before going on his hunt. The whole reason he's going out to hunt is to get food. But now you're telling him to eat first. Well if he has food to eat, then why go out to hunt?

79b187d791eae49070a90d6ca7ee5547

(125)

on March 12, 2012
at 11:20 AM

You have a good point. I was arriving at a Paleo way of eating before I even knew what Paleo meant. It just feels right for me and is in line with traditional eating, which just makes sense to me. Nowadays many of us, because of technological advances (juicing machines, transportation, etc.) seem to think that we've got a sudden intellectual "leg up" on nutrition over our forbears. To me, it's pure arrogance to think that we all of a sudden know how to nourish ourselves better than our ancestors. We have yet a lot to learn from them.

1
9936144ad8e1a7e00a28f5ff7604d06a

on July 19, 2013
at 08:51 PM

I'm curious... Dr. Hyman .. is he really a "Medical Doctor"? His site list "Ottawa University School of Medicine" ... there is not such school. Is he talking about the "University of Ottawa" in Canada or the one in the the USA that is primary a "mail order" school? No place does it mention where or when he practiced medicine. Did he do an internship somewhere and if so, what was his field of study? There seems to me a big lack of information about his medical training and practice as a Medical Doctor ... Would be interested in finding out more information about the real Mark Hyman, MD ..

Medium avatar

(10557)

on July 19, 2013
at 09:54 PM

It's interesting seeing all the one-time posts supporting Hyman over the past year. I've seen this kind of bot-posting on other diet blogs. It has the desired effect of keeping the book on the top of the string where people can see it. From time to time I'll call out one of the bookselling bots to see if they respond. Only one ever did.

D33a8d5f095a8532ddf7a0d6c27bfe63

(578)

on July 20, 2013
at 01:35 AM

The guy is legit and he has stellar credentials. He just happens to be a maverick and chose the off the beaten path. Once he became medical director of Canyon Ranch and went knee-deep in holistic alternative karma, he had no choice but to turn his back on conventional medicine -- his view usually through the lens of a vegetarian but more recently he's embraced fish, eggs, lean meats a la Dr. Furhman. Another cheerleader for nutrient density. Paleo, no but somewhat. And gluten-free, yes.

Medium avatar

(10557)

on July 20, 2013
at 06:37 PM

Thanks for the interesting info sataran. Holistic alternative karma goes way beyond paleo and med schools.

Medium avatar

(10557)

on July 20, 2013
at 06:48 PM

I still think he's a shyster, by using the title Dr. when he's really a holistic practitioner. His former medical career has no connection with what he's doing now.

Medium avatar

(10557)

on July 19, 2013
at 09:57 PM

And not being able to name a real university could be shysterism, but maybe he's just careless and forgetful about something that trivial.

D33a8d5f095a8532ddf7a0d6c27bfe63

(578)

on August 18, 2013
at 01:00 AM

What do you expect him to use, then? L.Ac., when he isn't one? The guy went to med skool and is board-certified but believes in holistic healing. He's not the only one. Why don't you give it a rest. You make yourself look bad by nit-picking.

Medium avatar

(10557)

on July 19, 2014
at 01:04 PM

Calling out a shyster isn't nitpicking satarin. This guy's not providing medical services anymore. He's retreading other people's work and appending is own unsupported holistic notions. That's dangerous.

1
02179357eed87545a6add1eee9e096ae

on February 16, 2013
at 03:08 PM

I did read Dr Hyman's book after being diagnosed with insulin resistance. It just sounded like clean eating common sense principles to me. I have been eating "clean" for a while but Dr Hyman's approach to looking at the glycemic load of foods really helped me discover what foods (regardless of whether they were healthy foods) I was eating that were causing me to gain weight (ie gluten, some "natural" sugars, dairy, and grains) I cut these foods out of my diet and I have lost 20 lbs in 6 weeks. Even better, this is a way of eating for life that I can live with.

1
97c60f650e34eea972e293f7a1bec160

on January 17, 2013
at 07:50 PM

I just want to say to those readers who think this approach is just another diet that the functional medicine approach that Dr Hyman recommends for controlling blood sugar and prediabetes is not just about reducing carbs. It is a multi faceted approach to create a healthier body. This is the difference between his approach and a 'traditional' low carb approach.

Medium avatar

(10557)

on July 19, 2014
at 12:03 PM

The difference? Coining a new word? Or recommending piles of supplements? Or flogging a book? Smells like an old retread.

1
709c2eb9777afb6a7aa002680167dbe4

on August 19, 2012
at 08:19 PM

Everyone who is susceptible (genetically) gets diabetes sooner or later. All a person can do is postpone it. A friend of mine who was slim all of her life and regularly exercises, got diagnosed type II diabetes - when she was 92. I asked her if she's taking meds (she's now 94) and she told me that she was just maintaining normal sugar levels by lifestyle. My Mum got diagnosed diabetes when she was in her late 60's. She was clinically obese (close to 300 lbs) and never exercised. Was a healthy eater basically but liked her chocolates. A cousin of my husband's got DXed with diabetes when she was 71. She's now 74, still gets around well, clinically obese and didn't really modify her diet. So you see a lot of this is a bill of goods. I am a lifetime member of Weight Watchers and have lost 110 lbs and kept it off for 2.5 years. I am 68 years old, exercise cardio daily, resistance training 3 or 4 times a week and yoga 4 or 5 times a week. No surgery or Dr Hyman's diet and I love my sweets and have them daily (in addition to lots of veggies and good food). I have normal sugar levels. it's hard enough to live on Weight Watchers - you have to journal your food daily. But at least you can eat anything you want. (I just finished a Dairy Queen sundae - I save up my discretionary points and have fun on Sundays). But with Hyman's program, you give up anything which tastes good. You can imagine how long most folks will stay on it. And as you can see, you can be slim and healthy and enjoy sweets and cake and ice cream in moderation.

Medium avatar

(10557)

on September 05, 2012
at 10:24 PM

Everyone who is susceptible to it becomes more prone to getting it as they age. I reversed my Type II by losing weight at age 54, but I expect that it could return at my lower weight as I get older.

1
79b187d791eae49070a90d6ca7ee5547

on March 02, 2012
at 01:06 PM

I like Dr. Hyman and have read several of his books. I think he's on target on a lot of things. I'm a bit suspicious of his association with Dr. Oz (he kinda creeps me out and is definitely too rooted in conventional medicine for my taste). That being said, I haven't read Hyman's new book, but if someone truly wants to control blood sugar and get their body back to a healthy state, applying traditional eating and paleo principles is definitely the way to go. Before I ever even read a Paleo book, I was telling my clients to eat in a paleoesque way as it works and just feels right, particularly related to blood sugar issues. I'm not surprised that Dr. Hyman's book does the same thing, even if inadvertently.

Medium avatar

(10557)

on March 02, 2012
at 02:22 PM

The website teasers mention ancestors but I don't see anything suggesting that we act like them. More like hook to sell books to paleos. The diet itself looks pretty much Med, except for a couple expensive game meats. Just another retread which co-opts egotistically to put bucks in the bank.

0
10b56cff3ddcd141303f85c9463740b1

on February 14, 2014
at 03:37 PM

@usernamedan mckinnon

He's legit, graduated from Cornell, and would not have been accepted into a family practice residency and the Univ of California otherwise. His suggestions are excellent compared with those with "diabesity" who've been couch potatoes subsisting on overly processed convenience foods, too many grains and added sugars. The diets and lifestyles of many Americans are horrid. We depend on laxatives, blood lowering/cholesterol lowering drugs, antacids, and all sorts of other unnatural to the body meds--I dare anyone to try eating as he suggests for a couple of months and report back how they're doing!

0
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78417)

on August 17, 2013
at 10:55 PM

AS A MEDICAL DOCTOR WHO HAS GONE OUT OF HIS WAY TO BE AN AUTODIDACT ON THIS SUBJECT FOLLOWING DECADES OF CLINICAL EXPERIENCE AFTER MEDICAL SCHOOL, INTERNSHIP AND RESIDENCY, DOCTORS LIKE DR. HYMAN DO US A VERY GREAT SERVICE EVEN IF YOU MAY HAVE A FEW NIT-PICKY ISSUES WITH THE ENTIRETY OF THE SCIENCE. BECOMING A WELL PUBLICIZED PHYSICIAN WITH A LARGE PRESENCE ON TALK SHOWS AND OTHER T.V. VENUES WITH A POWERFUL THOUGH "PATENTED" MESSAGE, AND A POPULAR AUTHOR BEATS THE YOU-KNOW-WHAT OUT OF THE SAME OLD TREAT DIABETES AND METABOLIC SYNDROME AFTER THE HORSE HAS LEFT THE BARN FROM THE MAINSTREAM MEDICAL COMMUNITY SPENDING 5 MINUTES WITH EACH PATIENT. ADD THAT TO THE APATHY AMERICANS SHOW FOR THEIR HEALTH UNLESS SOMEBODY SHAKES THEIR WORLD A LITTLE BY LINKING THEIR FAT ASSES AND DIABETES WITH A COINED TERM LIKE DIABESITY. THERE IS NEVER A 100% CASUE AND EFFECT LINK IN ANYTHING BUT THE ASSOCIATION IS SO STRONG IN THIS CONDITION AS TO BE WORTHY OF HAMMERING HOME HOWEVER THE GOOD DOCTOR CAN DO IT.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19142)

on August 18, 2013
at 09:17 PM

Jeez doc, turn off the caps lock, it's like you're shouting.

D33a8d5f095a8532ddf7a0d6c27bfe63

(578)

on August 18, 2013
at 01:08 AM

Good point, Doc. But most medical doctors don't completely abandon their clinical roots and have an itch for wanting to diagnose everything. And the same goes for you, too. Not all drugs are bad but what's this strange fetish you have for Crestor?

0
3685f4265ac63c843c8e6b49ac66d92a

on March 05, 2013
at 12:47 PM

-Eating whole grains instead of factory-processed carbs (including sugar) is not only more healthy, it's revolutionary! The Paleo diet omits carbs altogether, right? That is quite a difference. -Eat protein and grains, both with vegetables, at separate times. And eat fruit by itself. This is the most radical change you can make to your diet. They are digested at different rates by the body. Also with this method it is hard to overeat.

75d65450b6ff0be7b969fb321f1200ac

(2506)

on March 05, 2013
at 06:20 PM

Katie, the Paleo diet does NOT omit carbs altogether. Although there seems to be 50 shades of Paleo out there, even in its most strict form Paleo dieters do get carbs from fruit. The more permissive forms of Paleo, like what is suggested in the Perfect Health Diet, permits certain starchy veggies and suggests a 150 gram/day carb intake.

Medium avatar

(10557)

on July 19, 2013
at 10:03 PM

And I left out half a dozen more of you post-poppers...

Medium avatar

(10557)

on July 19, 2013
at 10:01 PM

Katie, Patie, FitFrankie: these are names for pet dogs! LOL you can do better than this book-flogging bots! At least TRY to make us believe you're humans!

0
356a8582dc17597d6493de6e47417c5a

(8)

on February 25, 2013
at 06:24 PM

Obviously if you cut calories you will lose some weight, but Dr Hyman's Blood Sugar Solution, is not only about cutting certain foods that make you sick, but also eating foods that will help you heal your body. We have finished the 6 week advanced plan, and we are no longer diabetic. As a side effect we lost weight, but we have no aches, pains, or problems, and we feel great. Most of the comments here are from people that claim not having read the book. Well, we not only read the book, watch the PBS video, but also followed it to a T, and we are grateful for writing it, because it helps us learn much more about the food we eat.

Medium avatar

(10557)

on July 20, 2013
at 06:19 PM

We? There's a malfunction somewhere in the auto-post program.

0
37ec7309eeeb995077d2ad45cfd49ef8

on January 16, 2013
at 04:04 AM

I appreciate your comments here. I think you've given an authentic review. I get almost all of my patients on paleo diet and as you know it takes care of many issues. However, Mark Hyman is on the cutting edge.

I through your comment about how his 6 underlying causes of diseases was absolutely 100% off base. In fact, by addressing those 6 underlying causes I see people overcome almost every disease and disoder that I'm presented with. He's on point. We'll never have the phone stick man "double blind" research studies done on humans that would "substantiate" scientific credibility for the toxins we are exposed to. Would you swollow a cup of benzene or a tsp of mercury. It would be inhuman... The world of science is backwards, just read lead research scientists for Canada Health's book "The Cure for Everything". He brings this truth into full light.

That's all I wanted to say. Great site and thanks for getting your view out there.

Medium avatar

(10557)

on July 19, 2014
at 12:16 PM

The world of science is backwards. Right buddy.

0
3571c533c681f400bfdba499182898e4

on January 01, 2013
at 10:53 PM

I have not read Dr. Hyman's book but have read a lot about his program. Seems to me this is rather similar to the information Dr. Atkins was researching and promoting at the time of his death. His approach was low carb, staying away from sugar, and taking supplements. Some people criticized his plan for being too loaded with fat, but many of us who tried it found that even though we might initially have overdone on bacon, butter, etc., we quickly reached a point where a little went a long way. We ended up balancing our intake of protein, vegetables and fat, and eventually adding in some whole grains. That, with a bit of exercise, does work for losing weight and balancing blood sugar.

I am suspicious of any doctor/scientist whose plan demands you give up everything all the time as it is bound to fail; or any doctor/scientist who claims to cure all these diseases with one plan. Many of these guys seem more interested in making big bucks by promoting their own line of supplements.

Diabetes and hypertension are issues for me, and only now am I seriously starting to address them beyond the medication level. I have begun exercise and am now looking to find a manageable way to adjust my diet. I think I will avoid Hyman's program because I am susceptible to low blood sugar from time to time and I don't want to exacerbate the possibility.

0
Bbecff737b280eaac8cfc720da433883

on November 20, 2012
at 11:31 PM

This is not psuedo-science. After much study and deliberation I discovered that modern scientists have known for at least ten years that 55% of modern society doesn't process carbohydrates from baked goods, pasta, etc. as well as the other 45% does. Hence people say they have cut their calories drastically (not good) and are still GAINING weight! For that portion of society, these types of carbs need to be limited and initially the person should not have any off them for a week or two, then slowly add them back into the diet minimally. This is a concept that has been introduced by other doctors and dieticians (see "The Metabolism Miracle"). Why? Because folks who are born insulin resistant that eat too many "simple carbohydrates" have an issue wherein the carbs go straight to the liver, which converts them to fat! If these people aren't limiting those carbs, every time they eat them, even if they are counting calories, THOSE calories are stored as fat. So much for calories in and out, the old mantra we were taught. I actually started doing the DASH diet and removed those types of carbs for about two weeks and slowly added some in, which is supposed to reset the function of the liver. It seems to be working because over a year (I'm near 60) I lost 53 pounds. I'm still losing-and have never lost that much before and KEPT IT OFF. My cravings are minimal and I just have the things I that really want sometimes. I also stay away from additives and etc., soda, which can ruin your stomach. when I was a kid we didn't eat all of these processed foods. I would check in with a dietician who know this method first and make certain that this is a plan for you. But it's not a fad diet...

0
7320c5f95c167f9c1e53681beb074d57

(0)

on September 05, 2012
at 04:32 PM

moderation is the word. You can eat many food but a small portion. I saw people in "all you can eat restaurant"... It is very disturbing....4..5..6...+ plates of food because it is cheap, if food prices in many places were up and smaller portion people would be used to this and eat less. See the european, restaurant portion are much smaller than ours...they are not heavy like us.

0
4112b6a8a428eaeb4aa3c6e0be6e61ac

on August 11, 2012
at 02:11 PM

@thhq much interested.

Medium avatar

(10557)

on September 05, 2012
at 10:19 PM

I used the booklet offered here, which I originally got from my dr. http://www2.massgeneral.org/bmg/diabetes/1500%20meal%20plan.pdf The methodology could be adapted to any diet, from vegan to SAD to paleo. It forces you away from eating easy-to-digest carbs by limiting them. Part of this is done by overall caloric restriction, and part is done by causing you to deplete your allowed exchanges with fairly small amounts of the undesirable carbs. The system was developed by the ADA 50-60 years ago, and is somewhat similar to weight watchers points, though the intent is to control blood sugar.

0
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78417)

on March 02, 2012
at 01:21 PM

Perhaps you can get a sense of Dr Hyman here - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IhkLcpJTV9M

B4e1fa6a8cf43d2b69d97a99dfca262c

(10265)

on March 02, 2012
at 02:32 PM

what a great speaker!

Ab58508bbbb977aed2b33d0b0056bdd9

on July 18, 2014
at 09:54 PM

Dr. Hyman is all about selling books and making money not legitimate information

0
Medium avatar

(10557)

on March 02, 2012
at 11:39 AM

I've never heard of him before and I don't buy diet books, so thanks for the link. The website is slick and garrulous, and focused on selling his books. It reveals a plan that sounds similar to the Mediterranean diet. I didn't see anything about activity, so apparently it's a dietary approach rather than a lifestyle change.

19fad2250daf78bd0379b1840ce03ef9

(60)

on March 12, 2012
at 02:54 PM

That's not true. The book talks about performing regular exercise. He recommends weight training as well as HIIT. But the bulk of the book focuses on diet. He does make clear, however, that this isn't temporary nor should the focus be on losing weight. He's more concerned with optimizing health. Weight loss happens as a side effect.

Medium avatar

(10557)

on March 13, 2012
at 12:34 PM

So what I said is true then. It's mostly about diet. Why quibble? I don't buy the books, and am only interested in tracking the ideas. Compared to "the master cleanse" and "last chance" the NE is tame.

0424267365461e2b4bbd8d083bf87ac2

(0)

on April 07, 2012
at 02:49 PM

What an arrogant fool, read the book - then award yourself the winner...

Medium avatar

(10557)

on April 07, 2012
at 10:21 PM

Ulsterman ask me a question about carb exchange counting and I'll tell you intelligently why it worked to get rid of my diabetes. I don't need to know about Hyman's method in detail but I like to stay aware of the current fads. Spend your money however you like but don't tell me how to spend mine.

4112b6a8a428eaeb4aa3c6e0be6e61ac

(0)

on August 11, 2012
at 02:12 PM

@thhq - Can you provide a link or elaborate the carb exchange counting that helped you to get rid of your diabetes? Very much interested.

Medium avatar

(10557)

on July 19, 2014
at 01:13 PM

Here's how I fixed my Type II. This worked faster than Hyman's 6 week plan - blood sugar was controlled in 2 weeks and no more metformin for me.

https://www.novomedlink.com/diabetes-patient-suppo...

It's the big secret Hyman doesn't want you to know about.

-2
533cad725dd10479850ba5a5ed8272b6

(-4)

on June 12, 2013
at 06:40 AM

spam spam spam spam spam spam

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