3

votes

Conventional chicken livers, eat or throw away?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 05, 2012 at 12:05 PM

I have some cooking in the oven but I am reading both that they are good and that they are bad. Some say it's good to eat them, not to worry too much like for example Marks Daily Apply says this:

"Livers from organic, pasture-raised animals are obviously going to be tastier (almost sweet, in my experience), more nutritious, and cleaner, but I think you can safely eat the occasional liver meal from conventionally raised animals, too."

Read more: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/does-the-liver-store-toxins/#ixzz1iaJHhbuz

But then I search other sites they say not to eat them at all.

I wont be buying them again, but should I throw these away?

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on January 07, 2012
at 09:04 PM

8 dollars per pound (the cheapest I can find) is pretty expensive to me. Is this about 1 pound chicken livers? (Warning, big image, can slow down Internet) http://catastrophysicist.files.wordpress.com/2010/11/dscn0048.jpg If I buy one pound liver and I make a meal, and that's the *only meat* in my dish, how much would I need per person?

7d2130fc55c08199428859a7ecbee052

on January 07, 2012
at 01:43 PM

You'd be surprised how inexepensive livers directly from your farmer can be. It really isn't that expensive. Ask your farmer how they raise the animals/what the are fed (!)/how they are attended to medically (hormones/chemicals/etc) and then make your decision. I am a farmer and our organ meats are not expensive at all. They taste great and they're "clean" of any "stuff".

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18686)

on January 05, 2012
at 05:23 PM

If you're not going to eat them, send them to me!

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on January 05, 2012
at 03:53 PM

On the other hand, if you are still unsure about eating them, then toss them. Avoid the mental doubt and aggravation - stressing over whether to eat something can be unhealthy in and of itself.

733a30ce7f0d245683ac5827d61f51e5

(0)

on January 05, 2012
at 03:26 PM

Im with Luisa on this one. Its difficult for me to find quality organics and grass Fed meats so I do the very best I can with what's available

867c4fdab36cbaf93cb003bbb9d58f6d

(115)

on January 05, 2012
at 01:38 PM

There are some in this topic: http://paleohacks.com/questions/84026/how-to-prepare-cafo-beef-chicken-liver-if-it-has-significant-toxin-levels#axzz1iagbX0HM And other posts here on Paleohacks and around the web.

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5 Answers

3
A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on January 05, 2012
at 01:24 PM

Can you post links to the naysayers? I'd like to see what they are saying, because conventional wisdom is to avoid all liver - the opposite of ancestral wisdom or paleo thinking. Grass fed beef liver is the best, nutritionally, and pretty cheap too. But I wouldn't toss the chicken livers. Sisson's advice is generally pretty well thought out. Unless I saw some serious science that they were very bad for you - I would eat them!

867c4fdab36cbaf93cb003bbb9d58f6d

(115)

on January 05, 2012
at 01:38 PM

There are some in this topic: http://paleohacks.com/questions/84026/how-to-prepare-cafo-beef-chicken-liver-if-it-has-significant-toxin-levels#axzz1iagbX0HM And other posts here on Paleohacks and around the web.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on January 05, 2012
at 03:53 PM

On the other hand, if you are still unsure about eating them, then toss them. Avoid the mental doubt and aggravation - stressing over whether to eat something can be unhealthy in and of itself.

2
7c9f81d68c78de1a31eab9c91c17b4b8

on January 05, 2012
at 03:30 PM

Heck yes eat it. I think your plan not to re-buy is good but there is no reason to waste it.

2
19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on January 05, 2012
at 03:12 PM

I think the benefits outweigh the drawbacks.
But nothing we say is going to help you make up your mind. You've done your research, and you still aren't sure.

Me: I'd eat them. I can't afford good quality stuff, so I do the best I can, even if it's conventionally grown.

733a30ce7f0d245683ac5827d61f51e5

(0)

on January 05, 2012
at 03:26 PM

Im with Luisa on this one. Its difficult for me to find quality organics and grass Fed meats so I do the very best I can with what's available

7d2130fc55c08199428859a7ecbee052

on January 07, 2012
at 01:43 PM

You'd be surprised how inexepensive livers directly from your farmer can be. It really isn't that expensive. Ask your farmer how they raise the animals/what the are fed (!)/how they are attended to medically (hormones/chemicals/etc) and then make your decision. I am a farmer and our organ meats are not expensive at all. They taste great and they're "clean" of any "stuff".

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on January 07, 2012
at 09:04 PM

8 dollars per pound (the cheapest I can find) is pretty expensive to me. Is this about 1 pound chicken livers? (Warning, big image, can slow down Internet) http://catastrophysicist.files.wordpress.com/2010/11/dscn0048.jpg If I buy one pound liver and I make a meal, and that's the *only meat* in my dish, how much would I need per person?

0
D21b8d46d0ebadedf6012db0a504d507

on March 10, 2014
at 11:50 PM

I would, and have, ate them. Around here, conventionally farmed chicken livers frequently turn up for less than a dollar a pound (1.25lb tubs of Tyson livers at the 99¢ store, to be exact) and I buy them up and eat them. I do worry just how much of a dose of toxins I'm getting, but I figure my body needs the nutrients for detox and repair even more than I need to avoid further exposure.

I can tell you that when I first ate them I'd just been bouncing back from some poverty-induced malnutrition (think subsisting on rice, plain pasta, and pretzels for over two months) and I'd been having major meat cravings, for obvious reasons. I'd fallen into a deep depression/anxiety/funk, and while liver wasn't the only thing that I changed at the same point (better eating, anti-depressants, found a job) I think it made a major difference in my body's ability to recover, vis a vis the raw nutrients to support thyroid function and neurotransmitter synthesis.

I did look it up, wikipedia I think, and while the liver is what sorts and processes all these toxins, the body doesn't actually store them in the liver, it stores them in the fat. Logically I figure there's still a higher dose than than in the lean muscle, but if you're going to eat factory farmed meat the consensus seems to be avoid its' fat. I'd also make sure they're kept frozen a couple weeks first, just to kill off anything these poor unhealthy animals might have been carrying.

0
6cdc6b1e75690cfcc4804a6c9eaa910a

(2171)

on January 05, 2012
at 01:25 PM

I'd say it depends on what else you have available to eat...ie what would you substitute them with in your food intake. If I had those chicken livers or some salad without protein, I'd eat the livers. If I had a nice grass-fed lamb joint I'd roasted the night before, just sitting in the fridge waiting to be cut (guess what I did last night!!!) I'd throw the livers and eat the lamb. And then buy proper ones next time...

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