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Homemade ice cream using inulin or oligofructose?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 13, 2010 at 4:48 PM

Someone posted a few weeks ago on one of the blogs that they make homemade ice cream using inulin or oligofructose to improve 'mouth feel' in low sugar ice cream; unfortunately I can't find it again. I have made ice cream with very little to no sugar and the texture isn't good. I would love to figure out a way to make ice cream with limited sugar. Any help is appreciated!

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on May 29, 2010
at 04:01 PM

Any updates on the ice cream making ?

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on May 29, 2010
at 04:00 PM

Chef Durandal can I ask for more info about how to make N(02) Ice cream ? :D

E9cccfaee11043eaaeac04150a845e6e

(80)

on March 14, 2010
at 02:46 PM

Thanks, Nick. I will try that! Might have to add a few chocolate chips but at least my husband especially likes bananas.

E9cccfaee11043eaaeac04150a845e6e

(80)

on March 14, 2010
at 02:45 PM

I think an "ose" in any form may not be good...probably just need to make ice cream less often, although I usually restrict it to birthdays but we have a lot of them! At least homemade doesn't have high fructose corn syrup!

E9cccfaee11043eaaeac04150a845e6e

(80)

on March 14, 2010
at 02:42 PM

Good point, Acton. The rule of thumb for most ice cream recipes is 1 C of sugar to 4 cups of milk/cream; some contain eggs or egg yolks, and some don't, and flavorings/additions, like berries or chocolate. The variations are endless but the ratio of sugar to dairy is fairly consistent. I can cut the sugar by about 20% in any recipe I've tried, but more than that and the texture suffers proportionately. A poster somewhere said he corrected that problem with inulin or oligofructose. I probably should make less ice cream anyway....

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5 Answers

3
6b73f0c4b971e2dde7147920e329fe7f

(2041)

on March 13, 2010
at 04:54 PM

You could try using egg yolk instead of gassy soluble fiber. It's hard to give a suggestion how to improve a recipe without knowing specifically what you are doing. Could you post your current recipe?

E9cccfaee11043eaaeac04150a845e6e

(80)

on March 14, 2010
at 02:42 PM

Good point, Acton. The rule of thumb for most ice cream recipes is 1 C of sugar to 4 cups of milk/cream; some contain eggs or egg yolks, and some don't, and flavorings/additions, like berries or chocolate. The variations are endless but the ratio of sugar to dairy is fairly consistent. I can cut the sugar by about 20% in any recipe I've tried, but more than that and the texture suffers proportionately. A poster somewhere said he corrected that problem with inulin or oligofructose. I probably should make less ice cream anyway....

1
A89f9751a97c3082802dc0bcbe4e9208

(13978)

on March 14, 2010
at 05:23 PM

Use a tablespoon of arrowroot powder and a table spoon of stevia powder. The arrowroot is a perfectly reasonable unprocessed tuber powder (use in limited quantities) and the stevia adds the sweet.

0
60b0d3e60670f645cca59f67710b4820

on March 14, 2010
at 07:29 PM

The mouth-feel of ice cream comes from the amount of air fluffed into it. Try using liquid nitrogen to make it more "airy."

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on May 29, 2010
at 04:00 PM

Chef Durandal can I ask for more info about how to make N(02) Ice cream ? :D

0
B1b9f0574aa9571f6aec6adb81d43190

(578)

on March 13, 2010
at 10:59 PM

Have you ever tried this recipe for banana ice-cream? It only uses bananas, so I'm pretty sure it qualifies in the low-added sugar category. Out of luck if you don't like bananas, though :D.

E9cccfaee11043eaaeac04150a845e6e

(80)

on March 14, 2010
at 02:46 PM

Thanks, Nick. I will try that! Might have to add a few chocolate chips but at least my husband especially likes bananas.

0
2a80e1ce6ddda9e4e65f78d867320524

(103)

on March 13, 2010
at 06:02 PM

Check out this link: http://high-fat-nutrition.blogspot.com/2008/08/food-optimal-ice-cream.html

That recipe uses sucrose and honey for sweetness and flavor. I would ditch the honey. In another post, he mentions using dextrose (google dextrose powder or glucose powder) as opposed to sucrose (which is fructose and glucose). Enjoy!

E9cccfaee11043eaaeac04150a845e6e

(80)

on March 14, 2010
at 02:45 PM

I think an "ose" in any form may not be good...probably just need to make ice cream less often, although I usually restrict it to birthdays but we have a lot of them! At least homemade doesn't have high fructose corn syrup!

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