1

votes

Pastured pork/grassfed beef/free-range chicken/lamb : organ meats?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 08, 2012 at 12:03 AM

Is there a reason to buy them grassfed/pastured? -Chicken -Beef -Pork -Lamb -Duck -Veal

  • Livers
  • hearts
  • Kidneys (not so sure about the normal cows/pigs.)
  • Gizzard (chicken, turkey)
  • Tripe (beef)
  • Tongue

i.e. Chicken Liver/gizzards are about $1-2 normally, but runs up to about $10 a lb for the free range ones.

What would Mark Sisson say? http://www.marksdailyapple.com/organ-meats

35ba1f50dad25c85ac1aa2599fe5c5cb

(2485)

on January 17, 2012
at 09:18 PM

I find that US Wellness meats are overpriced for organ meats when compared to my local producers. I can get grassfed beef liver for $3-6 a pound (no shipping), depending on which suppliers have it that week.

D10ca8d11301c2f4993ac2279ce4b930

(5242)

on January 08, 2012
at 01:29 AM

and beef is still more like $5 a lb : http://www.grasslandbeef.com/Categories.bok?category=Grassland+Beef%3ABeef+Organ+Meats

D10ca8d11301c2f4993ac2279ce4b930

(5242)

on January 08, 2012
at 01:28 AM

Yes, $10 at least for chicken stuff... i.e. http://www.grasslandbeef.com/Detail.bok?no=1102 http://www.grasslandbeef.com/Detail.bok?no=1101 http://www.grasslandbeef.com/Detail.bok?no=1100

  • D10ca8d11301c2f4993ac2279ce4b930

    asked by

    (5242)
  • Views
    1.6K
  • Last Activity
    649D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

4 Answers

2
Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19160)

on January 17, 2012
at 08:35 PM

I'm less hung up on "organic" than I am sticking to "happy", locally raised, and grass-fed / pastured animals. But the point is always to minimize your exposure to the crap we as a society shits into the environment every minute of every day. Sadly, eating conventionally raised animal products is the best way to consistently expose yourself to pollutants.

When I moved from capital-region NY to near Boston, MA, I was expecting my costs to go up. In grocery stores, prices have gone up in general. However, prices at the farmer's markets are still pretty much the same -- very reasonable.

I can only speak for tongue (bovine), liver (lamb, goat, chicken, bovine), and heart (bovine, lamb), as I eat them regularly and only grassfed and/or "pastured".

I find liver (esp. lamb) to be about $3/lb. Hearts, $3.50/lb. Tongue, $2/lb. All grass-fed, pastured, anti-biotic free.

I would never consider paying $10/lb for liver. Ever. A website, that ships to you, offers a premium service, so you are likely paying for that if you order online. I suggest you utilize the farms and farmers closest to you.

1
246ebf68e35743f62e5e187891b9cba0

(21415)

on January 18, 2012
at 01:51 AM

My rancher co-op GIVES me beef tongue, oxtails, heart etc... he keeps them in his freezer and gives them away to his customers that request it. I still have about 20lbs of beef leaf fat in my freezer (of an original 40lbs) he gave me a year ago that I'd make into tallow if my crock pot hadn't, well, crocked.

I think one of the other co-op partners has dibs on the liver, because he never has any. Not to worry, his goats will be ready for harvest next time and I'm going to make sure that ends up on my plate.

0
414da8254d4032f5054b0e41e4e31556

on January 18, 2012
at 08:22 PM

I was just discussing the price of good meat recently with someone after feasting on a home-cooked banquet at which the centerpiece was a $100 goose. At first, I was amazed that a goose cost $100. But then I thought, in Charles Dicken's day, a goose probably cost much more than the average working-man's daily wage. And now, I can afford one on much less than one day's wage.

Then the conversation drifted to how we expect food to be so cheap... but so much of it is really is "cheap" as in low-quality.

Later, I ran some numbers and did a little historical research and found that according to http://measuringworth.com calculations, goose meat prices per pound in 1840 are about equivalent to year 2000 prices of £21.50 per pound using the retail price index or £206.00 using average earnings. So any way you calculate it, a $100 goose is a downright bargain!

0
Dfada6fe4982ab3b7557172f20632da8

(5332)

on January 08, 2012
at 12:11 AM

$10 really? No chickens around at the moment but my local well-fed beef and pig liver comes in at no more than $2.

And yes, there's a reason, the overall nutritional content, in particular balance of omega fatty acids but also the quality, taste, texture of the organs will be influenced by a healthier diet for the animal, making them better for us.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!