1

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is buckwheat paleo?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created July 08, 2012 at 5:41 PM

someone told me that buckwheat is a fruit therefore paleo... is that true?

94480caec9fbbaacc386d86a45efa720

(1007)

on March 20, 2013
at 04:09 PM

Sorry, Rick, buckwheat is in a completely different phylogeny. "Buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum) is in the family Polygonaceae along with rhubarb and sorrel." Please see the Botanist in the Kitchen: http://botanistinthekitchen.wordpress.com/2012/12/12/a-brief-history-of-gluten/

94480caec9fbbaacc386d86a45efa720

(1007)

on February 10, 2013
at 01:57 PM

I do fine with buckwheat as long as I do a soaking and fermenting process a lá Nourishing Traditions. I don't personally experience blood sugar rollercoaster feelings like I do with corn, white potato, and rice. As a female who had painful ovarian cysts somewhat (not quite PCOS) and was overweight long enough that I got myself a bit of insuling resistance, I figure the interesting phytochemicals are likely of benefit to me. ymmv...

94480caec9fbbaacc386d86a45efa720

(1007)

on February 10, 2013
at 01:54 PM

Sorry, Gigi, buckwheat is in a completely different phylogeny. "Buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum) is in the family Polygonaceae along with rhubarb and sorrel." Please see the Botanist in the Kitchen: http://botanistinthekitchen.wordpress.com/2012/12/12/a-brief-history-of-gluten/

B6c16d850e7305aad0507ad079ecf1d4

(232)

on February 10, 2013
at 03:39 AM

Psh, it's only shot down because of carbs. It says it requires a lot of preparation, but it doesn't seem like anymore than any other seed might... People do consume it raw.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41777)

on January 11, 2013
at 12:18 AM

@andrew, on similar caloric volumes of each, the nutrition difference is minimal.

Medium avatar

(10512)

on January 10, 2013
at 11:43 PM

Who cares? Not me.

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19160)

on January 10, 2013
at 11:42 PM

Sorry, you are wrong. Buckwheat is absolutely not in the grass family, poaceae. It is a flowering plant, yes, but *not* a grass.

Medium avatar

(10512)

on January 10, 2013
at 11:41 PM

Buckwheat is my go-to breading for frying.

4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(4999)

on July 09, 2012
at 06:58 AM

Soaking overnight with some kefir removes most anti nutrients. I eat it and consider it a good food source. I also agree with Matt above.

4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(4999)

on July 09, 2012
at 06:56 AM

Actually, it is hugely more nutritious than potato. Look at the minerals and vitamins in 100 grams white potato, baked http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/2551/2 and 100 grams of buckwheat http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/cereal-grains-and-pasta/5681/2

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12 Answers

14
1407bd6152d9fdbc239250385159fea1

on July 08, 2012
at 06:44 PM

Arbitrary classifying things as "paleo" or "not paleo" does not do anyone any good. I think that rather than do so, it might be more prudent to classify different foods as "beneficial," "without impact," or "harmful." Particular classifications will vary from person to person and even then, it is important to ascertain how often one is okay with eating foods that fall under the latter two categories.

With that said, buckwheat is no where near as harmful as wheat dough wrapped around industrial chicken 'product' and fried in corn oil, but it's still nowhere near as nutritious as say, a potato for instance.

Check out Chris Kresser's info./recipe regarding sourdough buckwheat pancakes: http://chriskresser.com/heavenly-sourdough-buckwheat-pancakes

4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(4999)

on July 09, 2012
at 06:56 AM

Actually, it is hugely more nutritious than potato. Look at the minerals and vitamins in 100 grams white potato, baked http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/2551/2 and 100 grams of buckwheat http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/cereal-grains-and-pasta/5681/2

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41777)

on January 11, 2013
at 12:18 AM

@andrew, on similar caloric volumes of each, the nutrition difference is minimal.

6
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41777)

on July 08, 2012
at 08:37 PM

Most folks will say not paleo, but mostly because folks don't regard it as nutrient dense. Personally, the obsession with maximizing nutrient density in every bite is a bit silly and not a good reason to DQ it from being paleo.

It's not something to base one's diet upon, but occasional consumption could fit a personal paleo framework.

Medium avatar

(10512)

on January 10, 2013
at 11:41 PM

Buckwheat is my go-to breading for frying.

2
936d87b719a732ffefb86420e19d9d14

on February 10, 2013
at 01:34 AM

OK Wiki says - buckwheat is related to sorrel, knotweed, and rhubarb.

Medicinal uses

Buckwheat contains a glucoside called rutin, a phytochemical that strengthens capillary walls.[36] One clinical study showed mixed results in the treatment of chronic venous insufficiency.[37] Dried buckwheat leaves were manufactured in Europe under the brand name "Fagorutin" for use as a tisane. It also contains galloylated propelargonidins and procyanidins.[38] Buckwheat contains D-chiro-inositol, a component of the secondary messenger pathway for insulin signal transduction found to be deficient in Type II diabetes and polycystic ovary syndrome. It is being studied for use in treating Type II diabetes.[39] [40] Research on D-chiro-inositol and PCOS has shown promising results.[41][42]

Also check out http://www.healthaliciousness.com/buckwheat.php for the nutricional breakdown.

Looks ok to me!

94480caec9fbbaacc386d86a45efa720

(1007)

on February 10, 2013
at 01:57 PM

I do fine with buckwheat as long as I do a soaking and fermenting process a lá Nourishing Traditions. I don't personally experience blood sugar rollercoaster feelings like I do with corn, white potato, and rice. As a female who had painful ovarian cysts somewhat (not quite PCOS) and was overweight long enough that I got myself a bit of insuling resistance, I figure the interesting phytochemicals are likely of benefit to me. ymmv...

Medium avatar

(10512)

on January 10, 2013
at 11:43 PM

Who cares? Not me.

B6c16d850e7305aad0507ad079ecf1d4

(232)

on February 10, 2013
at 03:39 AM

Psh, it's only shot down because of carbs. It says it requires a lot of preparation, but it doesn't seem like anymore than any other seed might... People do consume it raw.

1
755ae600a404915cde825c7577da260c

(10)

on May 22, 2013
at 09:23 AM

I've lived in Russia for a while, and toasted buckwheat kernels are boiled and eaten as a side dish, like potato or pasta. Buckwheat has a lot of good stuff in it, and the carbs are complex, so if eaten sparingly it should not cause an insulin spike. It is very nutritious, but it makes me feel bloated and gassy, so its not in my diet anymore.

1
B6c16d850e7305aad0507ad079ecf1d4

(232)

on February 10, 2013
at 03:48 AM

When I went to my friend's house there was nothing I could eat except this "holy crap" ("skinny b" version) cereal, which was just organic chia, hempseed and buckwheat. I've seen variations of this "cereal" in health food stores (always containing buckwheat and chia) and it would be comforting to know that the only thing concerning about buckwheat is the carbohydrate (which I don't watch personally).

1
9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

on July 08, 2012
at 08:15 PM

I put it in the same category as white rice, it is not as harmful as grains that contain gluten, doesn't have a lot of anti-nutrients, but also doesn't have many good nutrients, and is basically an empty starch. I think it is something you could have every now and then but I wouldn't have it more than once every week or two.

4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(4999)

on July 09, 2012
at 06:58 AM

Soaking overnight with some kefir removes most anti nutrients. I eat it and consider it a good food source. I also agree with Matt above.

0
7c09a44d334ef8a8c7c2644b0b7e1383

on May 22, 2013
at 05:59 PM

Try sourdough buckwheat. Much easier to digest, very nutritious, makes great pancakes.

0
Ce929c57e988b0f9a607922fb9654bee

on March 20, 2013
at 11:44 AM

Hi Gigi I'm with you on this one buckwheat to the best of my knowledge is a grass! At least that is what I was told while studying nutritional therapy.

94480caec9fbbaacc386d86a45efa720

(1007)

on March 20, 2013
at 04:09 PM

Sorry, Rick, buckwheat is in a completely different phylogeny. "Buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum) is in the family Polygonaceae along with rhubarb and sorrel." Please see the Botanist in the Kitchen: http://botanistinthekitchen.wordpress.com/2012/12/12/a-brief-history-of-gluten/

0
3e94499d874a469198d388fc49f00752

on February 22, 2013
at 12:37 AM

Buckwheat is definitely a part of my paleo recipes. Check out my paleo plan http://apaleodiet.info/category/paleo-diet-archive/

0
3720f5eb63757f8cdbf393ac7530c1c3

(259)

on January 11, 2013
at 12:04 AM

I thought buckwheat was related to rhubarb?

Paleo or not I don't know, but it plays havoc with my digestive system so I don't bother with it! I guess its back to that n=1 thing, if you have no trouble with it its fine for you :)

-1
Ee5a60151bce241e66e9660c90bd015b

on January 10, 2013
at 11:35 PM

Sorry you are all wrong. Buckwheat is technically a grass!!! Not a fruit and not a grain like rice. It is free of gluten. It is in fact much more nutrient dense than the "experts" on this post reported.

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19160)

on January 10, 2013
at 11:42 PM

Sorry, you are wrong. Buckwheat is absolutely not in the grass family, poaceae. It is a flowering plant, yes, but *not* a grass.

94480caec9fbbaacc386d86a45efa720

(1007)

on February 10, 2013
at 01:54 PM

Sorry, Gigi, buckwheat is in a completely different phylogeny. "Buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum) is in the family Polygonaceae along with rhubarb and sorrel." Please see the Botanist in the Kitchen: http://botanistinthekitchen.wordpress.com/2012/12/12/a-brief-history-of-gluten/

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