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coconut allergy

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created May 17, 2010 at 8:03 PM

I am trying to get my picky kids to eat healthier by slipping things into their meals they would normally not eat. For example adding cauliflower to mashed potatoes or carrots to tomato sauce. I would like to start using healthier oils too.

My question is two parts. First, my youngest got a rash from topical coconut oil, like in sunscreen, and is allergic to almonds. I assume that means he would just as allergic, or more so to ingesting it, correct? Second, I know animal fats are one, but they are not the best choice all of the time. What are some alternatives to coconut oil or animal fat?

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78447)

on May 19, 2010
at 05:24 PM

As an aside, it's generally better to eat food closer to raw. Science has found that well done meat can cause health issues. So your problems with "high heat" might be solvable simply by using lower heat.

A3bb2c70384b0664a933b45739bac32c

(951)

on May 19, 2010
at 03:49 PM

evoo oxidizes when heated. Even a lot of chefs are avoiding cooking with it. Most only use evoo for salads and cold preparations.

A3bb2c70384b0664a933b45739bac32c

(951)

on May 19, 2010
at 03:47 PM

I meant animal fats like tallow or lard. They burn easier in high heat, like stirfrying in a wok. I have used clarified butter for sauteing veggies, but you don't always want that flavor in what you are cooking.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78447)

on May 18, 2010
at 03:17 PM

Oh no, I just mean: the animal isn't *killed* to make butter. I guess I'm making the same distinction that some vegetarians do. Additionally, it's FAR easier to find grassfed butter than it is to find grassfed tallow.

37f4b3c51afbd92d259afaa171270874

(1219)

on May 18, 2010
at 08:30 AM

Is there some superior nutritional advantage I am unaware of? Or are you just making the distinction from a paleo perspective?

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78447)

on May 18, 2010
at 04:48 AM

While you're correct, ghee/butter are not tissue-based fats. They're excreted. That's why I made the distinction here.

37f4b3c51afbd92d259afaa171270874

(1219)

on May 18, 2010
at 04:03 AM

Ghee is an animal fat :-)

0a8f18c1bf567443a481a7fd40b3777d

(164)

on May 18, 2010
at 01:00 AM

If he's allergic to almonds, he's potentially allergic to tree nuts, including coconuts and macadamias.

1340fe0b7e7b01683ea33042092e05d6

(1693)

on May 17, 2010
at 11:27 PM

*cooking* with olive oil should be used very sparingly.

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4 Answers

5
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78447)

on May 17, 2010
at 08:38 PM

Why do you say animal fats "are not the best choice all of the time"? I would highly disagree. Animal fats are probably the best you can get.

That said, my additional staples would be: EVOO and ghee (clarified butter). Ghee is super easy to make. I'd recommend keeping some in the fridge/freezer. Just make sure to buy grass fed/finished butter, like Kerrygold.

37f4b3c51afbd92d259afaa171270874

(1219)

on May 18, 2010
at 04:03 AM

Ghee is an animal fat :-)

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78447)

on May 19, 2010
at 05:24 PM

As an aside, it's generally better to eat food closer to raw. Science has found that well done meat can cause health issues. So your problems with "high heat" might be solvable simply by using lower heat.

37f4b3c51afbd92d259afaa171270874

(1219)

on May 18, 2010
at 08:30 AM

Is there some superior nutritional advantage I am unaware of? Or are you just making the distinction from a paleo perspective?

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78447)

on May 18, 2010
at 04:48 AM

While you're correct, ghee/butter are not tissue-based fats. They're excreted. That's why I made the distinction here.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78447)

on May 18, 2010
at 03:17 PM

Oh no, I just mean: the animal isn't *killed* to make butter. I guess I'm making the same distinction that some vegetarians do. Additionally, it's FAR easier to find grassfed butter than it is to find grassfed tallow.

A3bb2c70384b0664a933b45739bac32c

(951)

on May 19, 2010
at 03:47 PM

I meant animal fats like tallow or lard. They burn easier in high heat, like stirfrying in a wok. I have used clarified butter for sauteing veggies, but you don't always want that flavor in what you are cooking.

3
4145b36f1488224964edac6258b75aff

(7821)

on May 17, 2010
at 08:29 PM

Don't feed the kid who got a rash from coconut anything with coconut until he is tested for that allergy. Your assumption about how he would react to ingesting coconut may or may not be accurate (it probably is), but there's no point in risking it.

Anecdotally, allergies improve when people eliminate gluten grains and excess omega-6 from their diets for a couple of months. Still, it's best to be careful.

Cook everything in butter and the oil problem is solved :)

1
1340fe0b7e7b01683ea33042092e05d6

on May 17, 2010
at 08:22 PM

I'd bet he may be allergic to one of the other several compounds found in that coconut tanning oil, who knows what the stuff is chalked full of.

Try to get them interested in avocados if possible, and also attempt to get them tested for coconut allergy as well.

Other oils you can cook with, albeit much more expensive and some are nut based as well: Red Palm Oil, Macadamia Oil, full fat (grassfed preferred) butter are the ones I stock my kitchen with.

I imagine though if you do you part and slowly take away the cereal grains in the morning (assuming that is what they eat) and start supplementing with eggs in stead, and slowly take away the sugar/starches if possible through out the day, you'll make leaps and bounds w/them.

0a8f18c1bf567443a481a7fd40b3777d

(164)

on May 18, 2010
at 01:00 AM

If he's allergic to almonds, he's potentially allergic to tree nuts, including coconuts and macadamias.

-4
33995f61a5ef2f3856dba8f520fff4dc

on May 17, 2010
at 08:10 PM

I cook nearly everything in Extra-Virgin Olive Oil. I would ask your doctor about the coconut oil.

1340fe0b7e7b01683ea33042092e05d6

(1693)

on May 17, 2010
at 11:27 PM

*cooking* with olive oil should be used very sparingly.

A3bb2c70384b0664a933b45739bac32c

(951)

on May 19, 2010
at 03:49 PM

evoo oxidizes when heated. Even a lot of chefs are avoiding cooking with it. Most only use evoo for salads and cold preparations.

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