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What about exercise makes it so healthy?

Answered on July 12, 2016
Created June 11, 2014 at 9:45 PM

What is it about exercise that makes it healthy?

Cf08ad26759fdd206a2c9f9385080a57

(995)

on June 12, 2014
at 07:42 PM

It just seems to me like males who engaged in physical activity in the past would have eaten more than 2,000 calories and that number seems a bit low to make a person "obese" by todays standards. I'm seeing prisoners of war eating a diet of 2400-2800 calories for sedentary activities to 4,300 calories for hard labor.

Medium avatar

(10583)

on June 12, 2014
at 07:39 PM

Continuing paleot, I exercise to maintain 165 lbs weight and have been successful at this for 7 years. Any counting error on calories-in is compensated with enough calories-out exercise to prevent weight regain.

Medium avatar

(10583)

on June 12, 2014
at 07:32 PM

paleot when you take my age into consideration my BMR (sleeping metabolism) is only 1540. Without question I undercount my food, but more like -10-20%, not 50%. Part of the reason I got fat is that I was still eating the same amount at age 60 as I was at age 30, in spite of steadily becoming less active as I aged. I never lumberjacked but I cut a lot of firewood and built a house when I was younger. That's a lot different than sleepwalking with my fingers on this iPhone.

Cf08ad26759fdd206a2c9f9385080a57

(995)

on June 12, 2014
at 06:53 PM

Looking at jobs from 100 years back, I'm seeing carpenters / mechanics at 3,000 kcal and lumberjacks / miners / heavy workers at 5,000. In 1910 the medical authorities of the British army tested a 12mi march with full equipment on a ration of 3100 calories. It was found that this would not keep the men in condition, so it was repeated with 4100 calories, which just about met their requirements, but in their opinion, 4,500 - 5,000 calories would be required to meet ordinary field service conditions. 2,000 is listed as a man in bed, haha. Perhaps you're underestimating your intake?

Medium avatar

on June 12, 2014
at 03:34 PM

Yup. :) Wise you are, grasshopper. Me, I'm just a wisearse.

Medium avatar

(10583)

on June 12, 2014
at 03:32 PM

Here's the history of the 2000 calorie RDA

http://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2011/08/...

My personal experience is that if I'm sedentary I maintain weight at 10x my body weight, which is about 1600-1700 calories. [If I were 30 years younger that would probably be 1800-1900 calories per Harris Benedict]. So unless I exercise I would become seriously overweight eating 2000 calories. In reality I eat 2300-2400 - but this balances off against 700-1000 calories per day of exercise, and I maintain my 165 lb weight.

06bf7b92d77f1ac1d8e3dc9d539d8254

(1649)

on June 12, 2014
at 03:18 PM

"A male diet used to be 2000 calories a day… this diet will make most males overweight" Really? Where do you get such "facts." When was "used to be"? 2000 calories today, for an average size, mostly sedentary male, is probably the right amount.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19217)

on June 12, 2014
at 05:13 AM

0bc176844623a6e5187ca527adb96328

(18)

on June 12, 2014
at 03:41 AM

I'm sorry, I don't understand your answer; could you elaborate?

Cf08ad26759fdd206a2c9f9385080a57

(995)

on June 12, 2014
at 12:24 AM

2,000 calories seems low to me. I'm looking at ~1950 kcal as a basal rate for sitting in a chair all day. With a mere 15m of a cycling and a few days of lifting, it's 2,500 kcal needed to avoid losing weight. Clicking the construction worker tab bumps me up around 2,800 kcal, and doubling down on exercise is over 3,000 kcal. With strict tracking, I want to say Attia was doing 4,000-4,500 kcal/d, with ~3,800 kcal required to maintain. At 2,000 calories + a lot of physical work, I think it would be difficult to stay above 8% body fat and keep hormones up. http://imgur.com/0Yi9XXH,Rn7DmSk

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on June 11, 2014
at 11:15 PM

I think that is mostly right. There's a yin/yang thing going on. But my point is that we did not evolve to exercise. We evolved to be active. We created an environment where being active is not rewarded (I.e. Most desk jobs pay better/ have more stability than the active jobs -- think programmer vs factory worker). Thus exercise is necessary to counter-act the sedentary nature.

0bc176844623a6e5187ca527adb96328

(18)

on June 11, 2014
at 10:26 PM

Thanks @cdone. My highschool literature teacher taught us that every action we take in the next 10 years will dramatically effect the rest of our lives. He then told us that doing nothing was a choice/action. Similarly it seems that you're saying that physical inactivity is an action and that choosing inactivity is bad for us rather than physical activity being good for us. Or more simply put, exercise is Good because it means you aren't choosing to be inactive and inactivity causes disease.

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6 Answers

1
Medium avatar

(10583)

on June 11, 2014
at 10:25 PM

1. Exercise is the only significant tool you have to increase your metabolism. A male's diet used to be 2000 calories a day, predicated on a lot of physical work. This diet will make most males overweight or obese at today's low level of exercise. if you want to eat more than a bare minimum of food you need to move.

2. Personally, exercise doubled my HDL level. My bloodstream lipids have been shifted in a positive direction for cardiovascular health.

3. If your heart stopped exercising you'd be dead. Our other muscles should be used the same way: involuntarily, without a thought, nearly continuously while we're awake.

Medium avatar

(10583)

on June 12, 2014
at 07:32 PM

paleot when you take my age into consideration my BMR (sleeping metabolism) is only 1540. Without question I undercount my food, but more like -10-20%, not 50%. Part of the reason I got fat is that I was still eating the same amount at age 60 as I was at age 30, in spite of steadily becoming less active as I aged. I never lumberjacked but I cut a lot of firewood and built a house when I was younger. That's a lot different than sleepwalking with my fingers on this iPhone.

Cf08ad26759fdd206a2c9f9385080a57

(995)

on June 12, 2014
at 12:24 AM

2,000 calories seems low to me. I'm looking at ~1950 kcal as a basal rate for sitting in a chair all day. With a mere 15m of a cycling and a few days of lifting, it's 2,500 kcal needed to avoid losing weight. Clicking the construction worker tab bumps me up around 2,800 kcal, and doubling down on exercise is over 3,000 kcal. With strict tracking, I want to say Attia was doing 4,000-4,500 kcal/d, with ~3,800 kcal required to maintain. At 2,000 calories + a lot of physical work, I think it would be difficult to stay above 8% body fat and keep hormones up. http://imgur.com/0Yi9XXH,Rn7DmSk

Medium avatar

(10583)

on June 12, 2014
at 07:39 PM

Continuing paleot, I exercise to maintain 165 lbs weight and have been successful at this for 7 years. Any counting error on calories-in is compensated with enough calories-out exercise to prevent weight regain.

06bf7b92d77f1ac1d8e3dc9d539d8254

(1649)

on June 12, 2014
at 03:18 PM

"A male diet used to be 2000 calories a day… this diet will make most males overweight" Really? Where do you get such "facts." When was "used to be"? 2000 calories today, for an average size, mostly sedentary male, is probably the right amount.

0
96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19217)

on July 12, 2016
at 05:58 PM

Both muscle tissue as well as fat tissue release cellular signaling molecules called cytokines. Fat (or more correctly adipose) release inflammatory cytokines that that drive your health down. Muscle tissue on the other hand releases myokines, which increase your health, but this only happens when you work out. At the same time, while you exercise, you dispose of excess glucose and possibly some of the fat stored in the muscle tissue depending on your heart rate and the form of the workout. Disposing of excess glucose is a good thing in our modern environment, as this releases some of the pressure on your pancreas to produce insulin, and in the long term helps you to avoid or even reverse insulin resistance, especially if you work out fasted and don't immediately consume a post workout meal after the workout. You'll also raise your basal metabolic rate for a short period following the workout. Exercise also increase blood flow, and therefore oxygen to your entire body, including extremities and especially your brain. Additionally to our circulatory system, there's a secondary system used for the immune system called the lymphatic system. Unlike the circulatory system, there's no pump like your heart to move the fluids in the lymphatic system - it relies solely on you moving around. Despite all this, you're not going to lose very much fat by simply exercising. And if you do loads of cardio, you'll actually increase stress and cause issues. Instead, you want your workouts to be of the HIIT syle as well as resistance training (i.e. lifting weights.) Some cardio is fine, keep it under 40mins/day, but try to keep it in the form of HIIT. You'll certainly lose weight if you do chronic cardio like jogging or marathoning, but this leads to muscle damage and note I said weight, not fat. You don't want to lose weight, you want to lose fat and fat only. Burning off muscle tissue because you're chronically stressing your body doing cardio is a really bad idea. You'll lose far more fat by increasing muscle mass as that will raise your basal metabolic rate, and if you're older it will stave off sarcopenia. Most people who die of old age die when they start to lose lean muscle mass. The more muscular you are, the more likely you're to avoid an early death.

0
242de29707a20334f5783742941455ea

on July 06, 2016
at 10:09 AM

Every exercise is better for our health. But it should be done in correct way or in proper order.  you need to be more focus towards your exercise. 

0
Medium avatar

on February 08, 2015
at 10:33 AM

the type of hormones secreted that follows working out has both physical and mental impact.

0
Medium avatar

on June 12, 2014
at 03:13 AM

"spark" on amazon

A word to the wise is sufficient

0bc176844623a6e5187ca527adb96328

(18)

on June 12, 2014
at 03:41 AM

I'm sorry, I don't understand your answer; could you elaborate?

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19217)

on June 12, 2014
at 05:13 AM

0
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on June 11, 2014
at 10:02 PM

Wrong question. The right question, what about living a sedentary lifestyle makes it so unhealthy: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC285752...

Exercise is the solution to prevent sedentary lifestyle. And the data is pretty clear, some is good, more is better. The threshold for too much activity is quite high for humans. However to prevent injury one must slowly increase their activity. But with proper rest and recovery it is almost impossible to exercise too much.

0bc176844623a6e5187ca527adb96328

(18)

on June 11, 2014
at 10:26 PM

Thanks @cdone. My highschool literature teacher taught us that every action we take in the next 10 years will dramatically effect the rest of our lives. He then told us that doing nothing was a choice/action. Similarly it seems that you're saying that physical inactivity is an action and that choosing inactivity is bad for us rather than physical activity being good for us. Or more simply put, exercise is Good because it means you aren't choosing to be inactive and inactivity causes disease.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on June 11, 2014
at 11:15 PM

I think that is mostly right. There's a yin/yang thing going on. But my point is that we did not evolve to exercise. We evolved to be active. We created an environment where being active is not rewarded (I.e. Most desk jobs pay better/ have more stability than the active jobs -- think programmer vs factory worker). Thus exercise is necessary to counter-act the sedentary nature.

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