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Endurance athletes and thiamine

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 08, 2012 at 8:07 PM

Considering thiamin's role in reducing the buildup of lactic acid, wouldn't this be a no-brainer supplement for athletes to improve performance and/or recovery?

Is it commonly used and I've just missed the boat so far?

http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/field/jimr/2008/00000036/00000006/art00008

It is concluded that TPP caused serum lactate levels and heart rate to be lower than placebo and Vo2max to be higher in athletes performing aerobic physical activity.

http://www.springerlink.com/content/t8785n5w6612w875/

Thiamine supplementation significantly suppressed the increase in blood glucose in the normal thiamine group and significantly decreased the number of complaints shortly after exercise in the subjective fatigue assessment of 30 items.

I took a B-complex after a long bike ride yesterday and feel pretty good today. I think I'll keep trying it.

Anyone else use B supplements?

And in case you all tell me to eat liver, I eat it fairly regularly.

9b0a4701e373d4dd13831cfb9b13f42d

(1667)

on May 20, 2013
at 08:13 PM

Thought you may find this thread of interest, as I have noticed profound effects from Thiamine. http://paleohacks.com/questions/196540/has-paleo-left-you-thiamine-deficient#axzz2TrePH8VK

07243c7700483a67386049f7b67d90a4

on May 02, 2012
at 03:25 PM

This is the only thing that made a noticeable difference for me and I tried all sorts, including B vits. Never high dose thiamine in isolation though.

Cfc7dee889a66db9cd76c4f348109294

(1652)

on January 08, 2012
at 10:29 PM

I also think that endurance athletes are eating more carbs, and therefore probably have a higher B1 requirement.

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2 Answers

1
5b5abb28f3cacf4f5a01497f2895d072

(238)

on May 02, 2012
at 01:00 PM

Another odd supplement can be baking soda - it's meant to reduce lactic acid buildup. http://www.livestrong.com/article/408081-recommended-dose-of-sodium-bicarbonate-for-alkalizing-lactic-acid-when-exercising/

07243c7700483a67386049f7b67d90a4

on May 02, 2012
at 03:25 PM

This is the only thing that made a noticeable difference for me and I tried all sorts, including B vits. Never high dose thiamine in isolation though.

0
Fb031dfd6b79e5617da593a2bf9b23cd

on April 27, 2012
at 03:55 PM

i've seen distance runners take beta-alanine and glucosamine. i haven't seen thiamine as a seperate supplement. perhaps because there's some 250% daily value in my multi-vutamin. i don't personally view a seperate b1 supplement as necessary. maybe others feel the same?

with that being said, i currently take a b-complex but not for distance running recovery, more because i am breastfeeding and read that b6 helps to level out your hormones. though i haven't noticed any marked improvement from taking the b-complex on recovery or energy levels. my problem stems from not getting enough sleep.

if you notice improvement, i say keep taking it. from my understanding, it can't hurt you as long as you don't exceed some 500mg of b6 which can cause nerve damage.

also, have you tried wearing compression socks, shorts, and ice baths? some swear by those too.

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