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Issue with Corn

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created November 17, 2010 at 4:32 PM

So I understand the negatives of gluten for most people, and some people's issues with potato (I get really achy if I eat too much potato), but what's the deal with corn?

I get that it's not Paleo, but what's are the main issues with it? I know most people can't digest it, but is that pretty much it?

I'm trying to look more at bodily health alot more than whether paleo man ate corn or not.

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10480)

on July 21, 2013
at 09:29 PM

Pellagra is cause by niacin deficiency. Corn does not cause it. Any diet that excludes niacin will lead to pellagra.

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on November 18, 2010
at 04:44 AM

I'd add that some people don't digest it.

Cfccbcf3450ac4919311ded8ef162d49

(2312)

on November 18, 2010
at 01:36 AM

Add tp that the fact that most corn today is GMO

4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on November 18, 2010
at 12:40 AM

fats are broken down into glucose too

47a42b6be94caf700fce9509e38bb6a4

(9647)

on November 18, 2010
at 12:39 AM

True, though I have to say I prefer getting what small amount of carbohydrate I do get from potatoes/sweet potatoes instead of fruit. Or occasional dairy.

06d21b99c58283ce575e36c4ecd4a458

(9958)

on November 18, 2010
at 12:19 AM

Thanks Paul, You are correct. All I wanted to say was that carbs are broken down to sugars...regardless of which form. It may matter to some as to which sugars are present and how the body processes each kind but to the average person just knowing that carbs convert to some kind of sugars is probably enough. We can talk about how differently fructose is handled by the liver as compared to glucose...but to what end? All forms are a serious assault on our bodies...whether they come from carbs or from table sugar.

47a42b6be94caf700fce9509e38bb6a4

(9647)

on November 17, 2010
at 10:51 PM

Well I think there's really nothing wrong with saying that starches (or even all carbohydrates) are chains of sugar, in that glucose (and really all mono- and disaccharides) can be referred to as "sugar". In fact that's why we can refer to blood glucose as "blood sugar" (and not "blood table sugar"). And then I think Dexter is also right to say that eating starch is *similar* to eating table sugar--but we know that there are significant differences, too. Like: fructose. Which is I think what you were trying to point out.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19230)

on November 17, 2010
at 09:54 PM

Correction: This progression doesn't happen to anyone on the planet.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19230)

on November 17, 2010
at 09:53 PM

Correction: This progression doesn't happen to anyone on the planet.

4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on November 17, 2010
at 09:39 PM

This is totally wrong. Starch = chains of glucose and table sugar = glucose + fructose disaccharide.

77732bf6bf2b8a360f523ef87c3b7523

(6157)

on November 17, 2010
at 09:16 PM

See also this post. http://www.thenourishinggourmet.com/2009/03/wisdom-from-the-past-nixtamalization-of-corn.html Personally, I'm not a big fan of eating grains, even after fermenting, soaking, sprouting, etc... but I wanna know if it's simply bias on my part or actually backed up by the biochemistry.

77732bf6bf2b8a360f523ef87c3b7523

(6157)

on November 17, 2010
at 09:11 PM

http://www.thenourishinggourmet.com/2009/03/nixtamalization-nutritional-benefits.html speaks very highly of nixtamalized corn, but it's a WAPF-leaning site.

E35e3d76547b18096a59c90029e7e107

(15603)

on November 17, 2010
at 08:30 PM

My suspicion is that if a food has to be heavily prepared, e.g. nixtamalised, to be tolerable then it is probably far from optimal even once it is tolerated.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on November 17, 2010
at 07:35 PM

High starch content, low nutrition. Definitely not a health food - not really much better than refined sugar. If you need starch carbs (as an athlete) then maybe okay, but wouldn't sweet potatoes or even bananas be better?

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on November 17, 2010
at 07:31 PM

I loves my crunchies! Nuts (careful not to oversnack), pork rinds with dip or salsa, celery with cream cheese or almond butter can satisfy the need to crunch. Or, just go with Sisson's 80/20 rule and have a little corn once in a while. Eat it without guilt for the pleasure of it - just know that its not really healthy in any way (other than it could be less damaging than donuts, oreos or a deep fried Snickers). Slather on some good quality butter to improve its overall nutritional value!!

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on November 17, 2010
at 07:29 PM

I loves my crunchies! Nuts (careful not to oversnack), pork rinds with dip or salsa, celery with cream cheese or almond butter can satisfy the need to crunch. Or, just go with Sisson's 80/20 rule and have a little corn once in a while. Eat it without guilt for the pleasure of it - just know that its not really healthy in any way (other than it could be less damaging than donuts, oreos or a deep fried Snickers).

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on November 17, 2010
at 07:26 PM

I loves my crunchies! Nuts (careful not to oversnack), pork rinds, celery with cream cheese or almond butter. Or just go with Sisson's 80/20 rule and have a little corn once in a while. Eat it without guilt for the pleasure of it - just know that its not really healthy in any way (other than it could be healthier than donuts or a deep fried Snickers).

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on November 17, 2010
at 07:26 PM

I loves my crunchies! Nuts (careful not to oversnack), pork rinds, celery with cream cheese or almond butter. Or just go with Sisson's 80/20 rule and have a little corn once in a while. Eat it without guilt for the pleasure of it - just know that its not really healthy in any way (other than it could be healthier than donuts or a deep fired Snickers).

77732bf6bf2b8a360f523ef87c3b7523

(6157)

on November 17, 2010
at 06:44 PM

Okay, then let's ask a more interesting question. What happens when you eat corn that is properly prepared (nixtamalized)? What's wrong with it, besides the fact that most any time you buy corn in the US, you are supporting Monsanto? I'm asking a serious question here.

1759614d2ac38131d8004c50da2d9899

(10)

on November 17, 2010
at 06:00 PM

corn = strong avoid.

Da773d29157aa4ad15ab2dad600c56a9

(90)

on November 17, 2010
at 05:02 PM

Mostly jonesing. I've cut most/all sugars and gluten, but I'm really struggling with having something crunchy. I'm feeling if there's nothing very negative with corn I can get some organics from TJ's on the weekends or when I'm really in a mood. Thanks!

  • Da773d29157aa4ad15ab2dad600c56a9

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8 Answers

best answer

1
A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on November 17, 2010
at 04:56 PM

Modern corn is mostly starch with very little nutritional value. I prefer to value nutritional density over empty calories. So, other than Insulin/Glucose problems and lack of nutrients, corn should be okay, I guess. OTOH, why bother? (Unless you're just jonesing for Fritos or popcorn)

Maybe its because corn has become the poster child for what's wrong with American agriculture that people are so down on it (King Corn, Food Inc.). Corn oil, HFCS are definitely not healthy and corn by products are in everything (dextrose, corn starch, MSG, etc.). I think some people don't digest it very well either.

Me? I'm a T2 diabetic - so just way too many carbs! lol.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on November 17, 2010
at 07:26 PM

I loves my crunchies! Nuts (careful not to oversnack), pork rinds, celery with cream cheese or almond butter. Or just go with Sisson's 80/20 rule and have a little corn once in a while. Eat it without guilt for the pleasure of it - just know that its not really healthy in any way (other than it could be healthier than donuts or a deep fried Snickers).

Da773d29157aa4ad15ab2dad600c56a9

(90)

on November 17, 2010
at 05:02 PM

Mostly jonesing. I've cut most/all sugars and gluten, but I'm really struggling with having something crunchy. I'm feeling if there's nothing very negative with corn I can get some organics from TJ's on the weekends or when I'm really in a mood. Thanks!

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on November 17, 2010
at 07:31 PM

I loves my crunchies! Nuts (careful not to oversnack), pork rinds with dip or salsa, celery with cream cheese or almond butter can satisfy the need to crunch. Or, just go with Sisson's 80/20 rule and have a little corn once in a while. Eat it without guilt for the pleasure of it - just know that its not really healthy in any way (other than it could be less damaging than donuts, oreos or a deep fried Snickers). Slather on some good quality butter to improve its overall nutritional value!!

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on November 17, 2010
at 07:29 PM

I loves my crunchies! Nuts (careful not to oversnack), pork rinds with dip or salsa, celery with cream cheese or almond butter can satisfy the need to crunch. Or, just go with Sisson's 80/20 rule and have a little corn once in a while. Eat it without guilt for the pleasure of it - just know that its not really healthy in any way (other than it could be less damaging than donuts, oreos or a deep fried Snickers).

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on November 17, 2010
at 07:26 PM

I loves my crunchies! Nuts (careful not to oversnack), pork rinds, celery with cream cheese or almond butter. Or just go with Sisson's 80/20 rule and have a little corn once in a while. Eat it without guilt for the pleasure of it - just know that its not really healthy in any way (other than it could be healthier than donuts or a deep fired Snickers).

best answer

2
62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on November 17, 2010
at 05:02 PM

Low nutrition, high phytic acid. They are a grain that doesn't want to be eaten. Peoples who eat too much corn that is not properly soaked and prepared come down with a nutritional deficiency called pellagra. Basically, I think of corn as empty calories.

E35e3d76547b18096a59c90029e7e107

(15603)

on November 17, 2010
at 08:30 PM

My suspicion is that if a food has to be heavily prepared, e.g. nixtamalised, to be tolerable then it is probably far from optimal even once it is tolerated.

77732bf6bf2b8a360f523ef87c3b7523

(6157)

on November 17, 2010
at 09:11 PM

http://www.thenourishinggourmet.com/2009/03/nixtamalization-nutritional-benefits.html speaks very highly of nixtamalized corn, but it's a WAPF-leaning site.

77732bf6bf2b8a360f523ef87c3b7523

(6157)

on November 17, 2010
at 09:16 PM

See also this post. http://www.thenourishinggourmet.com/2009/03/wisdom-from-the-past-nixtamalization-of-corn.html Personally, I'm not a big fan of eating grains, even after fermenting, soaking, sprouting, etc... but I wanna know if it's simply bias on my part or actually backed up by the biochemistry.

77732bf6bf2b8a360f523ef87c3b7523

(6157)

on November 17, 2010
at 06:44 PM

Okay, then let's ask a more interesting question. What happens when you eat corn that is properly prepared (nixtamalized)? What's wrong with it, besides the fact that most any time you buy corn in the US, you are supporting Monsanto? I'm asking a serious question here.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on November 17, 2010
at 07:35 PM

High starch content, low nutrition. Definitely not a health food - not really much better than refined sugar. If you need starch carbs (as an athlete) then maybe okay, but wouldn't sweet potatoes or even bananas be better?

Cfccbcf3450ac4919311ded8ef162d49

(2312)

on November 18, 2010
at 01:36 AM

Add tp that the fact that most corn today is GMO

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10480)

on July 21, 2013
at 09:29 PM

Pellagra is cause by niacin deficiency. Corn does not cause it. Any diet that excludes niacin will lead to pellagra.

2
Ef9f83cb4e1826261a44c173f733789e

on November 17, 2010
at 05:45 PM

In addition to the reasons already given, I can't support the corn industry for political reasons. I don't support industries on welfare if I can help it.

1
4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on November 17, 2010
at 09:40 PM

I like my starches to have lots of minerals and no omega 6 fats. Corn fails both tests. Eat potatoes or sweet potatoes.

1
4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

on November 17, 2010
at 06:37 PM

This has been asked before: the main issues

No nutritional value

Lectins

Prolamin: Zein (wheats prolamin is gluten)

GMO issues

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on November 18, 2010
at 04:44 AM

I'd add that some people don't digest it.

-1
D10fd9ad5b40df8f04b470530742471f

on July 21, 2013
at 11:35 AM

I don't eat corn! I can't even say the word c-o-r-n. I have to spell it out. Once, at the dinner table, I asked my wife, "how about some a-n-a-l tonight?" And my son went doodoo in his diaper. He is 40. See what corn does? It contains lectin, arsenic and HIV. Paleo man wouldn't piss on corn. If you are jonesin for corn, you are not paleo. Probably, you want to corn hole yourself! That is why I eat nothing but fruits, berries and twigs. I also like to grease myself up with buffalo lard. Once, I ate nothing but corn for two weeks. My friend Ricky dared me to do it. Do you know what happened? I pooped a pure corn log. The log looked just like corn on the cob. My butt hole was on fire! It wouldn't even flush. How f'd up is that?

-1
015f3cc633c3873de6ccee38c0a0ec56

on May 03, 2013
at 05:41 PM

meow im a kitty cat and i dance dance dance and i dance dance dance meow meow meow meow meow meow!!!!!!

-1
06d21b99c58283ce575e36c4ecd4a458

(9958)

on November 17, 2010
at 05:39 PM

Corn and corn products...like all carbohydrates...are nothing more than sugar molecules bonded together to look like a carb. When ingested, the bonds are broken down and it is similiar to eating table sugar. And then, of course, your blood sugar goes way up and your pancreas secret insulin to control the blood sugar and if you don't use that energy immediately, your body will store the unused energy in your cells as fat. Repeat this process daily and your pancreas will eventually poop out and will not be able to produce enough insulin. You have just arrived at type II diabetes and if your pancreas totally stop producing insulin, then you are a type I diabetic. You then need to inject insulin to control the blood sugar for the rest of your life.

This progression doesn't happen to everyone on the planet. But look at the obesity epidemic, the cardio vascular disease epidemic, the diabetic epidemic, the increasing rate of Alzheimer's...what do you think? Do you want to go down that road on the chance your body will take the wrong fork in the road?

For something crunchy, buy fresh jicama. Refrigerate and then slice and dice, squeeze lemon on the chunks and sprinkle iodized salt. A good snack that is loaded with inulin that will help heal the gut.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19230)

on November 17, 2010
at 09:53 PM

Correction: This progression doesn't happen to anyone on the planet.

06d21b99c58283ce575e36c4ecd4a458

(9958)

on November 18, 2010
at 12:19 AM

Thanks Paul, You are correct. All I wanted to say was that carbs are broken down to sugars...regardless of which form. It may matter to some as to which sugars are present and how the body processes each kind but to the average person just knowing that carbs convert to some kind of sugars is probably enough. We can talk about how differently fructose is handled by the liver as compared to glucose...but to what end? All forms are a serious assault on our bodies...whether they come from carbs or from table sugar.

4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on November 17, 2010
at 09:39 PM

This is totally wrong. Starch = chains of glucose and table sugar = glucose + fructose disaccharide.

0bc6cbb653cdc5e82400f6da920f11eb

(19230)

on November 17, 2010
at 09:54 PM

Correction: This progression doesn't happen to anyone on the planet.

47a42b6be94caf700fce9509e38bb6a4

(9647)

on November 18, 2010
at 12:39 AM

True, though I have to say I prefer getting what small amount of carbohydrate I do get from potatoes/sweet potatoes instead of fruit. Or occasional dairy.

47a42b6be94caf700fce9509e38bb6a4

(9647)

on November 17, 2010
at 10:51 PM

Well I think there's really nothing wrong with saying that starches (or even all carbohydrates) are chains of sugar, in that glucose (and really all mono- and disaccharides) can be referred to as "sugar". In fact that's why we can refer to blood glucose as "blood sugar" (and not "blood table sugar"). And then I think Dexter is also right to say that eating starch is *similar* to eating table sugar--but we know that there are significant differences, too. Like: fructose. Which is I think what you were trying to point out.

4781cf8ae1bfcb558dfb056af17bea94

(4359)

on November 18, 2010
at 12:40 AM

fats are broken down into glucose too

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