2

votes

how sour is the sauerkraut...

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created July 09, 2010 at 9:20 PM

that you make yourself? I'm making it for the first time and don't know when it is done. It's been 2 days on the countertop at 80-85 degrees. There is no sign of any spoiled area. The scent is just a little bit sour at this point, not like the store bought stuff - but don't they add vinegar to that?

I know from experience that I can let yogurt go on and on until it's almost too sour to take. Is there any danger (bacteria or otherwise) to letting the sauerkraut sit out too long? I used what I figured to be the minimal amount of salt in it.

E1fd3a5ea90cdbceb8a2aa4bcfa1b923

(474)

on February 02, 2011
at 06:30 PM

Continued from before. In about two weeks I'll take a jar and move it to the refrigerator for eating. The other jars can stay where they are for months as long as the temperature is cool and stable. You don't really need to mess with adding whey.

E1fd3a5ea90cdbceb8a2aa4bcfa1b923

(474)

on February 02, 2011
at 06:27 PM

Mine is as simple as you can get. Shred cabbage into a large stainless steel bowl. Add 2 teaspoons of canning salt per pound of cabbage. Squeeze with your hands until it starts to give off some liquid. Pack into wide mouth canning jars, pressing down as hard as you can. Top off jars with the liquid left in the bowl, filling all the way to the rim. Wipe the rim of the jar, and put on a canning lid and ring. Set each jar on a plate to catch any runoff and put in the back of a cabinet where the temperature is stable.

42321851a87415b340d215f629e574dc

(668)

on July 10, 2010
at 11:43 AM

I use whey to kick off all of my lacto-fermented foods. Sally Fallon is not referring to whey protein or powder here -- whey is a culture of bacterias that ferment things like yogurt, etc. Once you have some, you can use it to ferment numerous things.

  • 424563ee2575f0620ea221badabb40d7

    asked by

    (272)
  • Views
    1.7K
  • Last Activity
    646D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

5 Answers

5
C1ea79115a062250a7263764797faa30

(851)

on July 09, 2010
at 10:13 PM

As long as the solids remain completely covered by the level of the liquid, it can go for months and be fine. I typically let mine go for a week before I start in on it. So long as no pink or black molds develop on anything floating at the surface, it's cool. Mind that this is how I do it in Washington, so wherever you are getting 80 degree temperatures might be a little different.

1
A89f9751a97c3082802dc0bcbe4e9208

(13978)

on July 09, 2010
at 10:26 PM

I usually let mine sit by the pilot light of our gas heater for four or five days. I add chili powder to mine so the sour taste is mixed with the spicy. Yum!

0
39a1a0bc7855c084ac59df60fdf9c0dd

(1505)

on February 02, 2011
at 04:16 PM

Here is a recipe from Stephan Guyenet at Whole Health Source (a fantastic blog, BTW).

http://wholehealthsource.blogspot.com/2008/04/real-food-v-sauerkraut.html

0
4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(4999)

on July 10, 2010
at 07:54 AM

Can someone give exact details of how they make it please? I've read so many varients and I'd like to hear from someone who makes it successfully!

For example, Sally Fallon recommends adding whey. Is that really usual?

42321851a87415b340d215f629e574dc

(668)

on July 10, 2010
at 11:43 AM

I use whey to kick off all of my lacto-fermented foods. Sally Fallon is not referring to whey protein or powder here -- whey is a culture of bacterias that ferment things like yogurt, etc. Once you have some, you can use it to ferment numerous things.

E1fd3a5ea90cdbceb8a2aa4bcfa1b923

(474)

on February 02, 2011
at 06:30 PM

Continued from before. In about two weeks I'll take a jar and move it to the refrigerator for eating. The other jars can stay where they are for months as long as the temperature is cool and stable. You don't really need to mess with adding whey.

E1fd3a5ea90cdbceb8a2aa4bcfa1b923

(474)

on February 02, 2011
at 06:27 PM

Mine is as simple as you can get. Shred cabbage into a large stainless steel bowl. Add 2 teaspoons of canning salt per pound of cabbage. Squeeze with your hands until it starts to give off some liquid. Pack into wide mouth canning jars, pressing down as hard as you can. Top off jars with the liquid left in the bowl, filling all the way to the rim. Wipe the rim of the jar, and put on a canning lid and ring. Set each jar on a plate to catch any runoff and put in the back of a cabinet where the temperature is stable.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!