1

votes

Eating earthworms and other insects

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 25, 2013 at 4:08 PM

I know Sisson jokes in his book about "insects optional" in his primal style diet, but on my morning walk I noticed something.

There was a substantial downpour last night and it has been raining hard for several hours.

I noticed that many earthworms have surfaced in an effort to escape the (from their view) a crisis due to their little tunnel-homes being filled up with water.

Now, there wasn't pavement or sidewalks for them to easily be seen and gathered, but I still reckon this type of circumstance would lead other animals to hunker down, making it harder to hunt so our tribe would probably take advantage of the surfaced worms for a snack.

While on the topic of creepy crawlies, what other types of insects could we possibly look into harvesting for human consumption in an effort to curb world hunger?

E253f8ac1d139bf4d0bfb44debd1db21

on January 26, 2013
at 01:25 AM

The way of the future to provide high quality sustainable protein - and sparing animals from slaughter +1

Bfd70bb38267fcc2d762063d691fa226

(723)

on January 26, 2013
at 01:21 AM

I think in some countries they actually do cook insects and eat them on a regular basis! Some parts of the world even consider certain insects to be delicacies. I don't remember where and when I read this, but it was out there somewhere!

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5 Answers

2
24c27817ad9ac518946dda4a131737b5

on January 26, 2013
at 12:58 AM

A recent article on Science Daily (IIRC) discussed the idea of raising insects on an industrial scale, then grounding them up as a rich protein meal. The economics is promising due to a superlative conversion rate of feed to edible weight. But you first.

E253f8ac1d139bf4d0bfb44debd1db21

on January 26, 2013
at 01:25 AM

The way of the future to provide high quality sustainable protein - and sparing animals from slaughter +1

0
3b031bce7c181c10452ee202e2b54dc6

on January 25, 2013
at 11:57 PM

Well, I was thinking more of in a sense for when I go hike the Appalachian. I want to go with as little as possible and hopefully I can hunt some small game like rabbit and forage along the way.

Just knowing what to eat and what not to would be great.

Also, I'd like to think of insects as an under utilized food source we could tap in to to help with world hunger, much like horses are not consumed, but could be!

Bfd70bb38267fcc2d762063d691fa226

(723)

on January 26, 2013
at 01:21 AM

I think in some countries they actually do cook insects and eat them on a regular basis! Some parts of the world even consider certain insects to be delicacies. I don't remember where and when I read this, but it was out there somewhere!

0
C0ddf5f88d3d0cfab0c5d875b0eae9ec

on January 25, 2013
at 06:04 PM

John the Baptist lived on a diet of Locust (grasshoppers) and Honey (wild honey).

He was a healthy guy, King Herod's mother in law wanted his head, for judging her daughters marriage to be adulterous.

Moral of the story! Locust don't kill people, people kill people

0
1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on January 25, 2013
at 05:02 PM

I've heard that fried worms taste good with ketchup...

How to Eat Fried Worms

0
Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19160)

on January 25, 2013
at 04:11 PM

I know worms are edible, but ... well, they're not for me.

If you want to start somewhere, start with crickets. Easily procured (think pet shops for lizard feed), and super easy to cook up.

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